Want to know about paint?

Here's a PDF that explains various types of paint quite well...what's in them, characteristics, etc,
www.resene.co.nz/homeown/probsolv/Whatsinacanofpaint.pdf
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dadiOH
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The link didn't work....
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On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 07:23:43 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

It did for me...
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I had an error message when I clicked on the link, cut and paste worked perfectly, who knows.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

What did it do? The link is a direct PDF download, you may have to click on something to authorize that.
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dadiOH
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Link worked fine for me. You'll notice that both non-successful readers are Googlers...
That's an interesting article, by the way, especially the description of the curing process of acrylic latex. I now understand just why you should never paint with acrylic latex when the temperature is below 50F.
It's also interesting that there are differing levels convertibility (chemical reaction as part of the curing process) between different types of "convertible" paint formulae. Not being a chemist, I had assumed that reactive materials all reacted to the same degree; i.e.:that reaction either occurred or it did not.
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Tegger

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Further... there appears to be a small mistake in the article. Or maybe it's just a detail that got left out: They mention the banning of white lead as a pigment in the '70s. That's only partially true. White lead continues to be in common use for industrial applications. Paint used for machinery, for instance. I think there is a new push on to ban that too, as part of the new Consumer Safety legislation. Apparently the lawmakers are worried that kids will be chewing on their bicycle frames, or something like that.
It's the presence of industrial paints containing white lead that caused HIT Entertainment's problems a few years ago with their "Thomas the Tank Engine" toys. Apparently the Chinese manufacturer used industrial paint by mistake (or on purpose...) instead of the correct paint they were supposed to use.
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Tegger

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Whup. Mistake is mine. I missed where they said that lead-chromate pigments are still in use for automotive application. Probably was lead-chromate that HIT used, not white lead.
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wrote:

Link didn't work, but pasting the link did work.
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On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 07:23:43 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

It's time for you to buy a new computer!!!!
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On 4/21/2012 7:55 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Excellent article. The take-home messages for me are:
1. Match the paint to the application. (Yes, that's obvious.)
2. Beware of claims that a particular product excels in all properties. There are too many trade-offs between the various components of any paint for a single product to excel in all (ease of application, quick drying, hiding power from a single coat, durability, fade resistance, washability, weather resistance, price, etc.).
(The article was published in 2003. I wonder what the company would say about some of today's paints that claim to be self-priming.)
3. Don't economize by using leftover paint from one application in another very dissimilar one (eg., exterior vs. interior; metal vs. wallboard vs. wood).
4. In paints, there's a reason the expensive one are so: the ingredients (pigments of certain colors, for example) simply cost more. Contrary to the core philosophy of Consumer Reports - that good products aren't necessarily the most expensive ones - in paints, you get what you pay for.
Too bad the article didn't discuss the primers, or even offer one here: http://www.resene.co.nz/homeown/probsolv/probsolv.htm
They do have an interesting article about maintaining a painted surface and initial preparation. http://www.resene.co.nz/homeown/probsolv/maintaining_exterior_painted_surfaces.htm
Note these sentences: "A quality three-coat acrylic system can be expected to perform on timber weatherboards for 710 years. An oil-based or alkyd system may only last 46 years." Makes you wonder about claims for much longer times.
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http://www.resene.co.nz/homeown/probsolv/maintaining_exterior_painted_surfaces.htm
The surface has a lot to do with the time that the paint lasts. The numbers that you quoted for timber weatherboards are similar to my experience, but the paint on my present house that's sided with Hardie Plank (cement board siding) has already lasted 9 years and is probably OK for another 2-3.
Tomsic
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