Want a longer lasting light bulb

I put two standard 25-40 watt light bulbs in my pump house every winter to keep things from freezing. Is there a longer lasting bulb out there? These usually of out mid-winter and I have to make sure I catch it or I could have problems.
I read where putting in European Bulbs that run off 230volts, run at our 115 last a long time. Only problem, where do I get these bulbs if they are the solution?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mel wrote:

You can get 130W lamps if you hunt for them. What I suggest is putting two 120V (US standard lamps) in a series so the current flows through one and then through the second one. That means each lamp gets only 60V. Remember that they will make less heat that way so two pair of 40W lamps will provide about the same heat as two 25W lamps as you have then wired now. You can also use a diode to reduce the voltage 50% but I think the double lamp is more trouble free.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you were simply needing a long lasting bulb, I would suggest compact fluorescents. They last years. Of course, they won't put off enough heat to be useful in your situation.
They do make "long life" light bulbs. They are actually bulbs rated for 130V, so they run at less than full load when run on standard 120V power.
Using a similar idea, you might get longer bulb life if you install a dimmer switch so the bulbs aren't running full power. Of course, you'll probably need to increase the wattage of the bulb to compensate for the decreased heat output.
You can also try bulbs rated for ceiling fans. They have a bit sturdier construction than regular bulbs, as they have to resist the vibration from ceiling fans.
Otherwise, leave the bulbs on all the time. The thermal shock of turning the light on and off is what tends to burn out bulbs the most.
You might also consider a dedicated heater with a thermostat. They're fairly inexpensive, and will last a very long time. I use a small 2' long electric baseboard heater (about 500 watts), so I don't have a fan or other moving parts to worry about. Works fine.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I brought 220v bulbs back from Europe in 74, they have lasted 10-15 years run apx 6 hrs a day, google 220v bulbs. With incandesant bulbs they are truely "Heaters" out puting only apx 10% light and 90% heat. But you still loose that 10%. why wouldnt one 40 watt pipe freeze wire just hanging work, you will get very long safe life and 100% heat output.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
m Ransley wrote:

Actually you would not loose even that 10% in a typical pump house. The light will fall on a wall, where it is absorbed and turned to heat. Both kinds of bulbs are 100% efficient unless the light leaves the room as light.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Running two bulbs in series or a dimmer are a good idea, a bulb rated at 1000hrs may last 5000hrs at 50% power and at 10% maybe 100000 hrs. Thermostat heat tape may be better it lasts, comes on only when needed and heats what is needed and the air. Insulate the box better with foam, if it gets sun paint it flat black. Something flat black can reach 80-120 degrees greater than air temp, even at 0f. For a bulb to be 100% efficient the box has to not absorb and loose any heat, probably a mirrored interior. For heat tape you may only need 20-30 watts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mel wrote:

130V bulb or alternatively, buy a rugged-use bulb designed for such applications as drop-cord trouble lights, etc. On the farm w/ more voltagle fluctuations than most townies owing to longer lines and the large well loads not being balanced by as many other loads I use 130V bulbs exclusively. Makes big difference in lifetime.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 25 Oct 2005 09:17:58 -0500, Duane Bozarth

I've seen small, radiant, fan-forced electric heaters as low as 500 watts. Such a heater on a line-voltage thermostat will probably save you money as it will only call for heat when needed and you will have some flexibility in determining the set-point. You can even use an electric oil-filled radiator on the low setting. Unlike the bulbs, these heaters last for years and almost never burn out.
Also, if your pump house is visible from the house, you can easily rig up some sort of indicator light that comes on when thermostat is calling for heat.
Beachcomber
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is Turtle.
The problem is you have a 120 volt rated light bulb attached to a so called 115 volt service but it is really 123 or 124 volt service going to most houses. So you have 124 volt electric service supplied to a light bulb rated for 120 volts service. So the light bulb is on voltage service higher than the light bulb is rated for.
So find you some Ruff Service light bulbs or really just 130 rated volt light bulbs. All automotive Parts store [ auto zone, Napa , or Pep Boy ] carry ruff service light bulbs and will have them for about $1.00 each. Also www.granger.com [ not the correct sight I think ] has these bulb called ruff service light bulbs. Now here is a warning here. If you want the light of a 75 watt bulb , you better get a 100 watt rated ruff surevice light bulb to get 60 watts of light. The Granger ruff service light bulbs last a long time [ like 2 to 4 years ] but just are very short of light of what it is stated as wattage to be given off. Here is a scale to see.
100 watt Ruff service = to a 75 watt regular light bulb. 75 watt Ruff service = to a 50 watt regular light bulb. 60 watt ruff service = to a 45 watt regular light bulb. 45 watt Ruff service = to a 25 watt regular light bulbs.
Now the bulbs at the auto parts houses seem to burn brighter than the www granger bulbs do.
Now also most all Helicopter landing pads with lighting will have ruff service 130 volt light bulbs in them. They don't like changing light bulb either.
TURTLE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you can't track down the 230V bulbs, screw-in halogen bulbs (e.g., Phillips Halogena) tend to have quite a bit longer life than standard incandescents.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dimmer Dimmer Dimmer Dimmer Dimmer Dimmer
150W on 1/4 power. Will last for ever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mel wrote:

You might try using some of the self-regulating heat strips. They look like a rubber extension cord and draw very little power at temperatures above 50F. As the temperature drops, they start to warm up. I like them better than bulbs because you can wrap them around pipes and pumps, and they won't burn out like a light bulb.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I also think you should look into self regulating heat tracing. I think you would be amazed how well (and efficient) even a low wattage one on an insulated pipe will work for freeze protection.
However, if you insist on using light bulbs, try adding more of them and don't necessarily replace them at the same time (stagger them) so they don't all go out at the same time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you don't need the lighting there all the time, try using a Goldenrod tube heater - I use them to raise temperature and lower humidity in several closets and enclosed spaces. Available from 12 watts on upwards. Very reliable, do not burn out, and none of their energy goes into lighting, if that is not needed in the pump house. Many retailers, mostly marine supply places, but here is garden shop offering one: http://www.onestopgardens.com/osg/taf/Displayitem_os.taf?itemnumberA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Light turns to heat when it hits walls.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes ight turns to heat when it his walls and unless a fully reflective barrier is used a major portion of that iis lost to the outside
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
m Ransley wrote:

Without windows the light hits the interior wall of the building turning to heat at the wall. Most of that will remain inside, although it will loose a little more than if it hit an interior wall.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mel wrote:

First, use raychem frostex heat tape where I could. It's not cheap, but it's very durable, effective, and very easy to install. Google for it, and get the 50' truck-pack.
Next, where I couldn't, I installed two 40W bulbs. One bulb was on a photocell. The photocell was just a cheap (under $10.00) doohickey designed to make a light come on at night. One end screwed into the bulb socket and the bulb screwed into a socket in the photocell.
So, now I had a backup!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A couple sugestions. First off, why not use heat tape instead.
If however you find the bulbs are needed, you could actually go hi-tech. Put in two sets of bulbs. Have a light sensor on the direct wired pair. If those burn out, the sensor will sense no light and turn on the other pair.
By the way, why do you use 2 bulbs? Just use one larger one, unless you want them spaced apart of something.
One other thing. You could use one of those orange colored heat lamps like they use in chicken barns, or use at McDonalds to keep the french fries warm. They are (I think) available in 100 or 150 watt. Then out a dimmer on the bulb to cut power use and to make bulbs last longer. They are made to heat, so you should get more heat from them.
Be sure you insulate your shed too, and have you considered a small electric heater that is on a thermostat? I realize electric heaters comsume more power, but it would only turn on when the temp went below freezing in there. You can buy plug in thermostats that are made for agriculture use, or could use a standard furnace thermostat with transformer and relay to operate it. That way you get precise control, unlike the built in electric heaters "controls" whose sensors are very vague as far as temperature.
Mark
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.