wallpaper removal with a Scunci Steamer?

My husband and I recently bought an old house just outside of Philadelphia, and are currently learning the joys of such things as wallpaper removal. After two treacherous weekends removing wallpaper in the hall bathroom, we had a thought, that we thought we'd run by online forums, before giving a whirl next weekend...
We KNOW that wallpaper removal steamers are completely different from Scunci Steamers. However, my mother gave us a Scunci Steamer (two actually, we're still trying to figure out why), for the holidays, which are still boxed up. Since the bathroom wallpaper is removed, and the only wallpaper requiring removal left are strips around the ceiling in two rooms (roughly 9" tall, running the circumference of each of the rooms, a border...quite hideous), we thought perhaps it would be easier than the DIF process we just completed in the hall bathroom.
Our walls are plaster. There is paint under the border, which doesn't appear to have been applied so expertly, by the previous homeowner.
Any thoughts?
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A sponge and bucket of water. Dampen a section of the wall paper and let sit for awhile. Do not let it dry out. Scrape and pull. Repeat. A 4-6 inch putty knife works when you need a little extra convincing
I used a wallpaper steamer on the parents home. Some areas had 8 layers of paper. Steamer worked well for that application. If there is only one layer I would do as I described.
Have fun. I am ripping out carpet this week on my home.
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ari wrote:

I'm using an old windex spray bottle filled with mostly water, a squirt of dish soap and a few ounces of rubbing alcohol. The soap eliminates surface tension that prevents the water from getting soaked up by the wallpaper backing. Alcohol may do the same [somebody told me to include it and it seems to help].
I use a roller scraper tool that puts little gouges in the surface of the wallpaper to the spray can soak in over a large area. Patience is critical because it take awhile to soak in.
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 16:09:03 -0400, "William W. Plummer"

I removed some wallpaper last night using straight vinegar in a spray bottle. Let it soak in. Scrape with a razor edge wallpaper scraper and rinse Thoroughly with clear water. I used a Scotch Bright pad for that. It helped get off any residue.
If you use a razor scrapper, be sure to keep a low angle with the wall to avoid digging in. ____________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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My advice is to forget everything except the wallpaper steamer. We bought an old house (1795) in NH with lots of wallpaper. After lots of research, we tried vinigar, glue removal solution, fabric softener, spraying, sponging, covering the damp wall with plastic, wallpaper tiger. Everything. Then out of frustration we bought a $50 wagner steamer and it changed everything. Much faster, less messy, and less destructive to walls so less patching later on.
The soaking solutions work to some degree, but why spend all that time? I find it very tedious and unrewarding.
-jeff

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