Wallpaper removal question

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I assume that you just pull the wallpaper off without wetting it. If so, the brown paper left on the wall is the backing of the wallpaper. Spray it with water and let the water soak in. With luck, the brown backing will then be easly removed with a scraper (a putty knife works well). After removal, make sure all the glue from the wallpaper has been removed. Use DIF (a solution made to soften the glue) if necessary. The wallpaper backing must be removed.
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What you are seeing is the backing of the wall paper. the wallpaper has separated and the glue is still on the wall, leaving you with the vinyl/whaterever in your hand, that brown stuff has to come off, usually with lots of hard work. if you paint over it you will forever see bumps and rough patches. I found using a lot of water, to soften the glue and a good scrapper to be the best method of removing. however, in one room it was so bad that it was easier to just put a coat of mud over the entire room to clean up the bumps.
Dave
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hi Please click this link. http://www.zinsser.com/ProjectDetails.asp?ProjectID6
First of all i can't tell from the link whether the brown paper is the drywall paper or the wall paper covering? Secondly the talk about leaving it in place/
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well,
the color of the wallboard/drywall paper should be the same color as the primer that was used to paint the house. usually white ish. so if what you have is brown, its most likely the backing paper. try wetting it and scrapping it off, if there is a smooth white surface below, thats your primed wall board.
worst possible scenario is that the wallpaper was put on without the drywall being primed.... then you are in for a fight. it will be tough to separate the backing paper from the drywall facing, again still often a light color, or maybe green in wet locations.
as for that product, I don't know why I would pay for something else if I can simply use drywall mud to cover any gouges/holes/mess points.
Dave
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sounds good from here, make sure you sand all your joint compound fixes really well, you can thin the joint compound out by mixing in a bit more water if necessary.
I don't know about oil primers vs other primers,
I've used Killz quite successfully in the past.
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The brown paper is part of the wallpaper. I spray on soapy water, (dish detergent is ok) let it soak then take it off with a scraper. Stubborn little bits come off easily with a plastic scrub pad.
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What you are doing is how I find it easiest to remove wallpaper. Remove the surface by peeling, not ripping, off the wall. The brown paper backing separates. Wet the paper backing left with rag and warm water. Let it sit 5 min. Wet it again. Sit 5 min. Should scrape off very easily with a putty knife. DOn;y let it dry before scraping. If not, try a 3rd wetting. If still not, oh boy.
The drywall surface is grey but hopefully was painted when installed. If you get below the grey surface, you will see brown drywall paper. Not good to get to that point.
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