Walling up the garage - brick or vinyl?


Moved into our row home in November and the previous owners finished the basement but left the metal garage door in place, so it gets cold down there during the winter (not sure how they put up with that). Also, the original entrance door (no storm door) has light coming through and is a mess, so that's getting walled up as well.
So I want to wall up the garage and put a 32" door in and wall up the smaller door entrance as well.
So I have a few questions:
1. Bricking it up is more expensive because of the labor and possibly because of the materials as well (or both), correct?
2. Which is the better insulator - brick or vinyl siding with insulation on the inside?
3. If brick is more expensive, and the better insulator, is it worth the price?
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Paul wrote:

Brick is a terrible insulator, R-value of about 0.80.* And vinyl is even worse (R-value 0.60). Concentrate on the filler between the outside and inside walls. For example, fiberglass has an R-value of about 4 per inch.
-------- * Adobe - sort of a brick - can act as a humongous heat sink if a couple of feet thick.
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yeah and spray foam has R of near R7, plus it seals up all the air leaks....
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Paul wrote:

Hi, You did not say where you live. I'd go for 2x6 frame and R20 min. insulation.
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Thanks all, but I have no idea what those R #'s mean. Clue me in ? What does the R stand for? And what does the number represent?
What would R20 insulation be?
OK, so might as well go Vinyl and then put money towards the insulation.
So vinyl on the outside, then behind it would be 2x6 or whatever frame, and then in the frame goes the insulation right? And then drywall over the frame on the inside right? Sound right?
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Paul wrote:

R = Square feet hours per BTU. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation.
For most of Pennsylvania, recommended R-values for walls is about R20. http://www1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html
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Almost. Multiply by F, the temp diff, as in R20 = 20 F-ft^2-h/Btu. A 10'x20' R20 wall with 70 F indoor air and 30 F outdoor air would have (70F-30F)10'x20'/R20 = 400 Btu/h flowing through it.
Nick
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Paul wrote:

Hi, R stand for resistance(of heat loss) I believe. Some vinyl has some insulating backing. From exterior towards interior, exterior vinyl siding > sheathing(3/8" OSB panel > 2x6 framing > vapour barrier > drywall. Easiest to work with is fiberglass batts to fill wall cavities between studs. You may need to run some wires for electric duples recetacles, etc.
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I live in Southeastern PA.
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No doors to outside? What about safe exit from that basement area in event of say a fire? Anywindows you can break to get out. If not don't have anybody sleep down there? Wheel chair access?
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My original post stated i want to put a normal 32" door in.
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Paul,
Frame up a 2x6 wall in the opening. Take the time to seal and caulk all gaps where the top, side and bottom plates meet the existing structure. Use an insulation board product on the exterior studs, tape and seal all gaps and cover with vinyl siding.
Fill the stud wall with R-19 fiberglass with a vapor barrier and then cover with sheetrock. Caulk along the base where the drywall meets the existing floor. All things considered you should get to about R-25 on that currently cold hole in your wall. The caulk and sealing are very important parts of this.
This may very well become the "warmest" section of the entire basement wall.
Using a 2x6 stud wall means you will need to extend the jambs on the new 32" door but IMO it is worth the extra effort.
--
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

No idea how big the basement room is, and how much headroom, but if there is some way to leave the overhead door in place and block it off with an insulated faux wall and drop ceiling on the inside, the place may be easier to sell when time comes. (Essentially convert the garage opening into a Real Wide but shallow storage closet.) As to the worn-out service door- unless it simply too narrow to use, I'd just replace the door and frame with a quality pre-hung exterior door. Next owner may want a garage, and a faux wall is quick to remove. If ceiling is too low to leave OH door operable, you could add some straps where the curved part of rail starts, and remove the uphill rail sections and stash them in the dead space by the door.
If this is a row house, is there a HOA or CCRs on the deed, that limit the changes that can be made to exterior appearance? Be a shame to remove and wall up that garage, and then have some neighbor bitch because a house with no garage lowers their property values. IOW, there may be a reason previous owner left garage door in place.
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.
Appreciated, but there are plenty of rowhomes in our community that have walled up there garages. So it's all up to code and all that.
Plus I will be putting a nice sized shed in our yard for storage. So no need for the garage at all.
The rows in our area are always selling as its a nice start up community for families. Lots of finished basements, decks, central air, etc added to these 60 yr old homes.
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wrote:

I've lived in rowhouse communities like that; they're a great element of the entire residence option spectrum.
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Paul wrote:

Put in an insulated garage door so you can open it when you want to.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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Paul,
Sounds like it's time to head to the library and do a little research. Your local library will have lot's of books on home improvement. Neither vinyl siding or brick is intended to function as an insulator. I'd recommend vinyl siding since I suspect masonry will be beyond your skills. Be sure your work meets local building codes. You'll probably want to run a couple of electrical outlets on this new wall. So you need to learn about framing, insulating, siding, drywall, electrical, and hanging an exterior door. Don't forget the vapor barrier. This will keep you busy for a while. Don't let your helpers at the beer until you are done for the day. And don't be intimidated if this is your first DIY house project. This is very doable
Dave M.
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DIY? Hm.. I dunno 'bout that! :-O I'm not much of a handyman as far as.. well.. the only things I've ever done were replace outlets and paint. I'm not confident in tackling something like this on my own since I don't have any "buddies". So I'm paying a contractor to do it. I don't want to F anything up and would rather pay someone that's licensed, insured and referred.
But I appreciate the nudge in the direction. Just don't think this should be my first DIY project.
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wrote:

Brick won't insulate any better. A good reason to use brick is to match what is already there. All depends on how ugly you want it. Either way you will have to build a 2x wall behind it. One more thing: consider a larger door, much easier to get furniture in and out with a few more inches.
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Duly note, I know 32" is the door standard, didn't know they come a few inches bigger.
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