Wall Switch Height

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My neighbor is undergoing a major home renovation. His electrician is installing all wall switch boxes at 56" above the floor. This seems high. Since I too will soon need some new wall switches installed, I would like to know if there is a code regulation as to wall switch mounting height. Can anyone direct me to an answer or resource for this question?
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You and your neighbor can have the switches installed at a height comfortable to you, typically 48 inches on center

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48" o.c.? damn, i got ripped off!!! I have three switches in one receptacle box in one location, so they should have each been spaced about 4' apart instead? Who do I call to report this?!
RBM (remove this) wrote:

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Jim Conway wrote:

48 inches off the floor to pivot of switch, NOT 48 inches separation between switches!!!
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I am not sure about codes, but houses used to be built (maybe still are) on the dementions of the standard American male in the army. Some newer and smarter people are having the houses built with things like switches lower and receptcals higher. Door knobs are being place differant to make them easier to reach. If you are much taller or shorter than the 'standard male' then you may want to build a house with things at differant heigths if you plan on keeping the house for a long time.
It is easier to have a few recepticals around 4 feet or more off the floor. If I want to run a vacuum cleaner and need to move the cord from one room to the next, I don't have to bend down to get it. Just stand up and reach out for it.
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Put the switches 36" off the floor. Able-bodied folks as well as those in walkers and wheelchairs can access them equally well. I agree with raising the receptacles to 12-18" off the floor except where they are behind and above a countertop. If there are some locations where a 36-48" receptacle can be placed with good design, then do that too.
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Edwin Pawlowski ( snipped-for-privacy@snet.net) said...

It is not a viable issue for residential customers as they are charged for actual power used (kWh).
Industrial users tend to have heavy motor loads that create a lagging power factor. With a power factor of 1, kVA is equal to kW, so the facilities needed to deliver 1000 kWh only has to be able to carry 1000 kVAh, and the losses due to heating that equipment is at its minimum.
If the customer's power factor was 0.5, then the equiment need to deliver that same 1000 kWh needs to support 2000 kVAh! This means twice the current for the same power. Since heat losses are proportional to the SQUARE of the current, you lose FOUR times the power just heating the infrastructure.
Industrial customers are charged for kVAh if they exceed a certain threshold, so it is in their interest to keep the power factor close to 1. They maintian large capacitor banks to do so.
Residential customers do not generally run at a lagging power factor. In fact, it is likely they have a slightly LEADING power factor resulting from the combined capacitance of all the wiring in the home. I know this from when I used to work as a watchman in a plastics moulding plant. During the weekends when the plant was shut down, it was not unusual for the power factor to be about 0.9 on the leadinig side (there was a PF meter at the service entrance).
As the plant was started up and various motorized equipment was started, the power factor would shift towards the lagging side and capacitor banks would be switched in.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"I really think Canada should get over to Iraq as quickly as possible"
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wrote:

Wow. My chairs are right on the floor.
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mm wrote:

Too far off the floor means my feet do not touch the floor if my back is firmly pressed in the seat back. The only way to put feet flat on the floor is to slump in the chair.
Sorry if I was unclear.
Chairs/sofas are built for people that are significantly taller than we are so we are uncomfortable unless it is a recliner.
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Just a mention that there may be a local code on this. In Bolingbrook, Illinois (30 miles southwest of downtown Chicago) there is a code for height of switches and outlets. This was enacted to make them usable and visitable by people in wheel chairs and scooters. There are also codes for accessability from the driveway to the main living space, i.e. no 4-5" step at the front door.
Robert Gammon wrote:

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(snip)
LOWER.
Your realtor friend is behind the times. Houses that are adaptable for elderly and/or wheelchair using people are quite marketable, almost trendy. It is called 'aging in place'. Your being shorter than average means that most of the custom features you want also apply for down the road when mobility may be a problem. If you are getting professional design help, they have access to all sorts of books and standards on the subject, but most of them are pretty common-sense. Wide halls and doors, especially in the bathroom. Space to add or switch to a walk-in shower, maybe a vanity with knee space underneath. A 'no step' front entry and garage to kitchen transition. (Designed in, you don't even notice it. Added later, it screams 'target' to people that want to rob you.) You don't have to put all the features in now, just design the place to make them easy to add later.
aem sends...
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On Thu, 11 May 2006 22:14:59 GMT, "Ralph Mowery"

Yes. I need more of those (receptacles at switch height). I have installed a few, it's easy when the existing wires were run straight down to existing receptacles.
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Renovations should be done with some consideration of the needs of people in wheelchairs. IMHO, even 48 inches is a little too high.
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On Thu, 11 May 2006 22:29:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Neill Massello) wrote:

I have one 2-gang switch box that I put a receptacle in (this box DOES have a neutral wire). I got a device that has 2 switches in the space of one and used the other side of the box for a receptacle. It makes a good place for a night light, as well as for temporary use (as for a vacuum cleaner).
--
Mark Lloyd
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The NEC calls for switches not to be more than 6' 7" above the floor. No other regs on height.
--
Steve Barker



"kit" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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On Fri, 12 May 2006 00:41:27 GMT, "Steve Barker LT"
My house is up to code, then.

After I had a (verbal) fight with someone, I put in a peephole. I thought I put it several inches lower than my eye, and I'm only 5'8", and lower than all the other peepholes I've seen, but when I look at it now, it seems too short for a lot of short girls.
What height is recommended for them?
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Peep holes should be at the height of the item you're trying to see.
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"mm" < snipped-for-privacy@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
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On Fri, 12 May 2006 03:32:41 GMT, "Steve Barker LT"
I'm trying to see ants on the sidewalk outside. Does that mean the peep hole should be in the threshold under the door?
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wrote:

When I put a peephole in my front door, I put it at eye height. A later measurement showed it to be 64 inches off the floor.
While measuring things, I measures the light switch in here. The bottom of the cover plate was 50.5 inches off the floor.
--
Mark Lloyd
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On Fri, 12 May 2006 00:41:27 GMT, "Steve Barker LT"

All switches, or just the room-lights?
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