wall paper steamer for?

has anyone tried a wall paper steamer for removing popcorn ceilings and walls? seems it might be a possible solution?
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For walls, water works best. Along with a paper tiger, a good scraper, and lots of patience. A steamer can soften the underlying drywall. I've tried all sorts of things, and have removed a couple thousand square feet of wallpaper. It's all different, and getting it to the right wetness so just the glue and paper comes off is an acquired trait. Plus, don't forget to wipe afterward to remove thin layers and gobs of glue that will affect the finished paint job.
Spray popcorn ceiling with plain water. Let sit for a few minutes. Scrapes off easier than pancake batter. Be sure to wear eye protection and have down lots of visqueen.
Steve
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wrote:

A steamer works well on plaster walls, in my experience. But I'm really replying to emphasize Steve's last point, about thoroughly wiping down the walls afterward to remove the last glue residue. We weren't as assiduous about this as we should have been in our master bedroom (we had just moved in and wanted to get the room wallpaper removed and walls painted before we settled in there), and I can tell you that the paint over the last five years has just failed all along the edges near the ceiling. I foresee massive sanding for me in preparation for our next paint job.
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Umm, but the question was about using one on a POPCORN ceiling, which isn;'t held on with glue like wallpaper. I've never heard of anyone using one for that, nor would I think it would work well. Also, if it's popcorn, make sure to test for asbestos first and proceed accordingly.
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Just curious, do you recall if you primed over the area before painting? If so, latex or oil? If there were long term issues and it was primed with latex I'd buy into that. Oil base primer I'd be surprised. Not the first time.
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wrote:

I didn't prime over the area, I just applied two coats of Dutch Boy latex paint. See where cutting corners doesn't pay? Do it right, do it once.
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Wasn't being critical and hope you didn't take it that way. More for my education. At least we know it wasn't some cheap crud paint. Thanks for the response.
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wrote:

I didn't take your query as a criticism, rest assured. What you might find particularly interesting is that the peeling of the latex has been very gradual over the years. It's actually taken about five years for the full deterioration to occur. Now the bad spots look awful: rough wall texture (residual glue) covered with the original blue paint surrounded by the intended peach, after starting out with a slight stippling. So, when I get ready to repaint, I plan to sand down the rough texture. I may not need to prime afterward if I hit underlying paint.
This has been my second big paint lesson: to properly remove all residual wallpaper glue. My first was to follow paint manufacturer's dry time instructions exactly. In my first house in the master bedroom (gee, is there a theme here?), I was similarly anxious to get the room done so I could move the furniture in there, so I did the first coat of paint (Glidden flat, I think), but only allowed it one hour to dry, as I recall. Then I did the second coat, and the lovely result was an alligator texture to the wall. Ever since then, I've religiously read the label of each can of paint to make sure I allow proper time for drying, and I've not been disappointed.
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Well, I had to remove a bunch of wallpaper boarder that had been on for years. In some places it was caked pretty thick. Got off all I could with putty knife, water, greenie, vinegar, etc. Hadn't bought wallpaper steamer yet.
After doing all that I could still see some "glaze" in certain light. Latex primed it, mudded damaged areas, sanded mud, primed all of it again then painted. Came out looking good since walls had some kind of texture anyway.
I guess in 4-1/2 years I'll have to do a follow up :-)
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