waiting too long for hot water

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With "instant on" via a pump and a conventional tank water heater, you still may want to raise the hot water temperature on the tank to increase the heat storage and not run out of hot water as quickly.
Cheers, Wayne
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I think your problem is that you have a large amount of water that cools, and you have to wait until that is displaced by heated water before you get hot water at the faucet.
It follows that your supply line is too long, or too wide. Take a look at it. If it is routed indirectly, shorten it; if it is 3/4, replace it with 1/2 inch. I think insulation won't help much as it will not keep the water in the line hot overnight, or when it is not used for a few hours.
I solved a similar problem by running a second line from near the farthest faucet back to the bottom of the water heater, forming a loop. I insulated the supply line and left the return line uninsulated, and a check valve prevents backflow. Since the supply line is insulated, the water in there remains hotter. When it cools, it is forced through the return line to the heater. This works for me because I have a multi-story house (long vertical runs), I was able to install it easily when we were doing a tearout remodel of the bathroom, my plumbing is all indoors, and I live where we have far more heating degree days than cooling days. There is some inefficiency as it is like a radiator, and I have to heat a little more water than before, but on the other hand it uses no electricity and less water than before, and runs constantly and silently. I have had it in over two years now, and I am still amazed at the instant hot water, what a luxury!
In Atlanta, with plumbing in a crawlspace, this might not be the best option for you. You might consider tankless heaters near the point of use, possibly even eliminating your current water heater.
W.D. wrote:

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Yes, there should be a dedicated return that goes back to the cold water inlet of the water heater . Put a check valve in the return line so the water can't go the wrong way when the pump is off. Use a stainless steel or bronze or hi temp plastic pump. I see a lot of people use iron body pumps to save money, they die quickly & put rust in the water. you can also return to a tee installed at the drain valve on the water heater. Easier to do with a crawlspace or basement than with a slab. Sonetimes you have to go back into the cold line under the sink, but that can cause problems, like putting hot water into the toilet & cracking the toilet tank due to water temperature shocking the tank.
Stretch.
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Why? What is the difference between instant and regular at the same temperature?
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Those people are stupid. The beauty of instant is that you don't have to set it hotter to have more, you have all you need.
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Why not install a instant heater under the sink..
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"W.D." <wdanis at NO SPAM yahoo dot com> wrote in message

Nor much to do that is efficient. Recirculating pumps give the hot water fast, but you have a pump running and heat loss along the way. Insulating helps, of course.
No matter how hot the water in the tank is, the water in the pipe has to be emptied first. Not a cheap solution, but the point of use heaters reduce the time to just a few seconds. I have no idea of the cost to have one installed though.
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<snip>

Or how much it is to run one. Some electrics are 60 or more amps.
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