Wafer Board for concrete forms.

Can I use wafer board when I form up for my garage stem wall?
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Doesn't sound like a good idea...Never seen it done...I'd spring for the extra few bucks for plywood...
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Thpught this waterboard was only used for terrorist applications........
Smarty
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You need to learn to read and type....
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And you, sir, need to develop a sense of humor.......
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Do you mean OSB? If so it will work but the pattern will telegraph to the surface of the concrete. As long as it is below grade or you parge it won't be a problem.
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I hadn't heard of parging. In my area perhaps it is referred to as sacking? I don't plan on parging. The OSB board has two surfaces. One side you can see the chips. The other side has sort of a texture. I was thinking of using the texture side. I would spray with concrete cure before I poured.
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Parging is a coat of portland/sand mix over a wall. It is usually done to seal block but it will give you a smooth surface, within your abilities to trowel. If you put a pattern in it, we call it stucco. (very common here).
I think the other poster was talking about particle board. He is right, it does wick up moisture and not a very good concrete form material although I have seen it done. As long as the concrete sets before the particle board comes apart you are OK but you have to pray that it doesn't rain on your forms before you get the concrete in them.
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No- it wicks like a sponge, and has *no* strength- by the time you're done bracing it you might as well have used 2x lumber.
Use 2x12's & decking screws. When you're done you have some great shelving for your garage. A quick coat of oil & it comes cleans up real quick.
Jim
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wrote:

I used two inch lumber for my last foundation 20 years ago. They fastened together with metal straps and wedges. The lumber got reused in the floor of the house. No one does it this way any more locally. I can't buy the straps anymore. I still have some wedges left. There also is no way to reuse the lumber in this project though I have a lot of used 2X6's available. Now they appear to use 3/4 plywood and metal clips at the top and bottom. I could reuse the plywood to make cupbards inside the garage later. I thought I could reuse the wafer board. If it can't be reused it is so cheap I wouldn't care.
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Pat wrote:

I'm w/ Jim. You didn't give any clue as to the size of the pour, but unless it's tiny the lack of strength will either entail such an excess of bracing you might as well have used all bracing material or you'll end up w/ a bowed pour or worst of all, it'll blow out...
I'd follow the lead you outlined above or use the tubasickses you got on hand if had enough for the job...
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Pat, it is sad when people answer that don't know what they are talking about. The OSB is plenty strong enough, though most contractors stay with 3/4 BB plyform because you get more pours out of it. I don't know that I would use OSB with the stem wall clips, I just haven't used them. Contact the fellas at Ellis for an answer. I'm old enough to have formed and poured plenty of walls with 1x material, I've never seen commercial wall work done with 2x.
Do not put curing compound on the forms. Yes, do put form release oil on the forms (avoid getting it all over the rebar). Use the waxy side of the OSB against the concrete and don't worry about form release, though I would probably use it anyway.
If the walls are above 24", the forms require whalers and stiff backs or you can create wood framed pan forms. You must have a source for snap ties and camlocks in your area (some use button head ties and wedge or Jahn clamps)
A decent source for products and information: http://www.ellisforms.com/pages/home_page/panel_accessories/catalog_category.xml
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DanG wrote:

But OSB bending moment is only about half that of Doug fir ply from data from Canadian plywood association.
Whether it's "stiff enough" depends on how well braced and how much a pour, neither of which was provided. There's no doubt at all it'll take more bracing to maintain the same form straightness w/ OSB as compared to ply.
If you don't believe it, look up the bending moments data yourself...
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http://www.ellisforms.com/pages/home_page/panel_accessories/catalog_category.xml
This post helped. I learned Lowes is not the place to shop. I am thinking of using 3/4 plywood and reuse it for cupboards inside the garage. I like the looks of Jahn clamps and using a 2x4 whaler near the top and nailing the bottom of the plywood to a 2x6 fastened to the footing. Masco.net appears to be about 20 miles from me.
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