Volts and AC's and DC's and Gar. Door Opener

Exhibit A: Ancient Stanley garage door opener from the 1980's, runs -only- on 120v AC.
Exhibit B: Skylink universal gar. door remote kit. Receiver is designed to wire into push-button circuit, runs on 12v DC 100mA.
Exhibit C: Ancient Signalman converter, "for use with telephone". Input: 117v AC 60Hz 6W, standard male-spade plug. Output: 12v DC 300 mA
Would it at all be plausible to adapt C to enable B to work with A? How to wire? Just plug the converter input into wall, splice output to B receiver?
Thx, Will
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Seems to me that it would be unnecessary. Even old door operators have a set of momentary contact terminals that you connect your push buttons to. The wireless remotes that I've seen, just connect to those two screws, plug the device in to an outlet, and the remote closes it's switch momentarily.
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

Does the receiver require regulated, clean DC power and does the power supply put out clean, regulated DC power? If everything jives, it will work.
TDD
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 15:22:33 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Seems reasonable to assume ...

Assume so, for now ...

Modern openers run on 12v DC?
The receiver was designed to run on 12v DC from the opener. It has only 2 wires (same 2 as from opener to manual button).
Does that sufficiently muddy the waters?
W
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

It wouldn't be all that difficult to design a two wire interface from the opener so it operates when the 12 volt DC power is shorted. The trick is to limit the current the supply can sink into a dead short, then have a circuit that detects the voltage drop and triggers the opener. The 78xx series voltage regulators could be used in such a circuit without much trouble at all. If I saw the circuit diagram of the units involved or even installation instructions, I could figure it out. I've had a lot of experience in interfacing disparate systems. "Experience" means that someone has burned up more equipment than anyone else. "Stupid or dangerous" means that you haven't learned from your experiences. Some folks think I'm dangerous for some odd reason. Perhaps it's all that charred equipment?
TDD
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 17:52:04 -0500, The Daring Dufas

All I could find is:
http://www.skylinkhome.com/docs/manuals/ut/G6KR_manual_070207.pdf
As near as I can tell, the damnable thang was designed to run off the 12v DC from the modern openers. But my old Stanley runs -only- on it's own 120v AC.
Remember, the receiver has only 2 wires for operation.

What's a little carbon, here and there? Nobig deal! :-)
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

I looked at the manual. You should have no problem. The receiver runs off a 12 volt DC wall wart that plugs into the side of it with a 3.5 mm plug and the two wires are hooked up in parallel with the existing opener button. The remote has batteries. It's all right there in the instructions.
TDD
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On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 02:52:42 -0500, The Daring Dufas

It appears you are correct.
I re-visited the instructions. Reference to the wall wart was buried in the section for Multi-Function Wall Console (which I don't have), but applies to the single button install as well.
Now, if I can just find a 3.5 mm plug ...
Would you expect a single wall-wart to be adequate for 2 receivers (I got 2 openers)?
Much Thanks, Will
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

The plugs are readily available at Radio Shack or any electronic supply house. I have a pile of them because I install video surveillance systems among other things. The center pin is usually the (+) for the DC voltage power.
TDD
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 15:22:33 -0500, The Daring Dufas

I think it unlikely it has to jibe. (Jive is something else.)
I doubt the receiver requires clean or regulated power, and anything the "converter" puts out is probably fine, but you have to get the positve and negative correct. Does the receiver say which is supposed to be which? If so, you can use a volt-meter to see which is which on the converter.
but I don't think you mean converter. A converter nomrally converts DC current to AC. They often run off a car. But yours you say takes a 110 volt input. Do you mean an adapter? Is it a little black cube with prongs that plug into the wall? Or something like a laptop power cord. 300ma is three times as much as you need to run something that at most takes 100 ma. So they'll be a little wasted power. I'm not sure how much. Not all of it because when there is no power draw, it won't take as much AC as when there is powerdraw, and when there is 100 ma dra, it won't take as much AC as if it was in another situation putting out 300ma. You can sort of tell by how warm the box gets. All of the warmth is waste heat, and all of the warmth more than a smaller adapter would give is even more of a waste, but you can use it and keep your eyes open for a smaller 12 volt DC adapter.

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It sez polarity doesn't matter. Like for the push-button.

Yes.
I just don't see how I can wire it if it is designed to both run off and connect a 12v DC circuit when the object circuit is 120v AC.
W
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 21:44:22 -0500, Wilfred Xavier Pickles

It couldn't say that. There's a big difference btween a power supply and a switch.
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wrote:

IF the unit has a bridge rectifier on the input it could run either plarity OR AC. Otherwize, power polarity WILL matter. Switch polarity will not if it is either relay or MosFet switched. It will if it is darlington switched (or SCR)
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On Mon, 15 Jun 2009 00:23:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

But he said about the receiver "runs on 12v DC 100mA." I presume that's from the label. If they went to the trouble to put in a bridge rectifier, the label would say that it could run on AC also.
How many devices start off with a bridge rectifier and say that they will run on either DC or AC? Other than a 110 volt tube radio, I've never seen one.

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mm wrote:

He posted a link to the instructions, it's simple.
TDD
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