Vinyl Siding Thickness Does it Matter?

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I am doing the installation myself. Using Owens Corning. Is there any advantage to using a .044 verses .042 on traditional double four? Will the installation be better? Will it last longer? Doesn't seem like much difference in vinyl thickness. Price is not an issue. Thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

Well there are certainly differences in quality of vinyl siding. In general thicker is better and it will likely give you a better looking longer lasting and quieter result. When I re-side I will be looking for the thick stuff. Installation plays a very big part in the final result.
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Joseph Meehan

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when you reside, you should be looking at steel. not plastic junk.
steve
When I re-side I will be looking for the

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Steve Barker wrote:

The both have their advantages and disadvantages. The both come in different qualities. To consider either one junk is a very simplistic response and don't very helpful.

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Joseph Meehan

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Maybe it "don't very helpful" but which would you prefer? A steel armor or a vinyl one? It's a fact that vinyl expands about 40 times more than steel in temperature extremes. It's a fact that the nail holes are only slotted about an inch. It's a fact that if you span a distance greater than 20' with plastic, it's going to buckle in the heat. Not to mention, vinyl looks like shit.
steve

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Steve Barker wrote:

Steve,
Looks like you're stuck in the 60's, that's ok.
First, have you ever had to replace dented steel siding? I have, you don't unzip the panels like vinyl. You start at the top row, and remove down to the damaged panels. Our company made a small fortune off of insurance companies, doing this.
Second, I work in an area where temperatures are from one extreme, to another. I've never seen vinyl pop, except on poor installations, something you seem to have a grasp on.
Third, I've never seen steel or vinyl panels over a 20' length. And, I've traveled extensively throughout the USA. I had seen someone's brainstorm of attempting to run seamless vinyl, that idea fell by the wayside along with steel siding. You may want to read up on panel sizes, so you don't look like such an idiot.
You act like steel siding makes a structure, tank tough. Nothing could be further than the truth.
Fact is, any siding is a covering, just like floors, counter tops, paint, wall paper, roofs, etc.
For God's sake man, get a gripe.
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I don't look like an idiot. And there's plenty of houses in my area with sides over 20'. Including a couple spots on my ranch style house. and yes, you can run the steel continous across these spans. It can't be called seamless unless it is.
steve
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Steve Barker wrote:

Ok I believe you don't "look" like an idiot. :-)
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Steve Barker wrote:

Steve,
Looks like you're stuck in the 60's, that's ok.
First, have you ever had to replace dented steel siding? I have, you don't unzip the panels like vinyl. You start at the top row, and remove down to the damaged panels. Our company made a small fortune off of insurance companies, doing this.
Second, I work in an area where temperatures are from one extreme, to another. I've never seen vinyl pop, except on poor installations, something you seem to have a grasp on.
Third, I've never seen steel or vinyl panels over a 20' length. And, I've traveled extensively throughout the USA. I had seen someone's brainstorm of attempting to run seamless vinyl, that idea fell by the wayside along with steel siding. You may want to read up on panel sizes, so you don't look like such an idiot.
You act like steel siding makes a structure, tank tough. Nothing could be further than the truth.
Fact is, any siding is a covering, just like floors, counter tops, paint, wall paper, roofs, etc.
For God's sake man, get a grip.
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Steve Barker wrote:

Steel in a salt air environment is not advised.
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why? it has a baked enamel finish on it. sounds like a vinyl salesman to me...
steve

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So, it only rots where it hang on the nail. Still ain't gonna help when is starts falling off the house.
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documentation of such a happening?
steve

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Steve Barker wrote:

No, someone who lives by the ocean and sees everything rust - Powdercoated Stainless Steel, you name it - inside and out. I prefer stucco.
S
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stainless steel does not rust. You just lost all credibility.
steve

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Steve Barker wrote:

Actually Steve, there are many forms of stainless steel and yes it can rust.
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Steve Barker wrote:

WTF???
You better look up what "steel" means and what "stainless steel" means, also...
Hint--SS is a class of high-Ni/Cr iron alloys...
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group alt.home.repair:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel
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Stainless steel is a variety of alloys of iron with other metals. There's no such thing as "pure stainless steel", because there isn't just one "stainless steel".
There are different alloys/grades of stainless, which have different levels of protection against corrosion.
The stainless steel you see in cutlery is just as pure as any other, but expose it to, say, high temperature caustic solutions, it rusts.
Most "consumer grade" stainless won't stand up to continuous exposure to salt and moisture for decades on end. Or at least, not at 30 gauge.
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Chris Lewis,

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On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 11:24:52 -0500, "Steve Barker"
Now *you* have lost all credibility.
All steel is made from iron.
There made be some faux stainless steel that isn't, but I haven't heard of it.
I worked for six years at a steel company. In the office, but for each project they took us on a tour. They make stainless steel like they make other steel. They have a ladle of molten iron and they throw in different additives. It mixes all by itself, but they use an oxygen lance to make it mix faster and to burn off the excess carbon.
The thing that surprised me is that they don't just pour in the additives. They throw in the whole 40 or 50 pound bags of various chemicals, and the paper burns off as CO2 or just adds to the carbon content of the steel. In the old days maybe they didn't make an allowance for this small amount, but now everthing is planned in advance, and samples are taken and analysed while the steel is still in the ladle. In the old days they made 5 or 10 kinds** of steel at this plant, but now they make 100's from thousands of recipes**. Whatever the customer wants. Iron is by far the biggest ingredient of all of them.
Sometimes they throw scrap iron or scrap steel into the ladle.
**Counting different amounts of the same additives as different kinds, but there are also at least 10 different combinations of additives.
If it rusts, then it's

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