very confused-- Bleach vs. Mold

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Tim-bor.
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Some additional remarks:
I would prefer denaturated alcohol, its cheap and does work well by penetrating in the deep of the molded material and takes out the water of it and so dehydrates the mold what kills it. Besides, it is not harming the user.
But much more important is the question of the reason for mold growing. Here a lot of mistakes in thinking and doing are usual. Mostly the room is sealed with airtight windows and a heating system and technique, which first warms up the air and later the material (wall, ceiling, ...) and will cool off the exterior walls every night. So I would recommend putting out the upper rubber of airtight windows, permanent heating and often this both gets rid with mold attack. Some further advice I have done in the linked info:
Mold attack - A Guide
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Jack wrote:

The last place I lived (apartment) had windows that leaked incredibly badly. After a few years there was mold inside the walls, which of course got washed out and onto our carpet when it rained good. I asked an amateur mycologist of my acquaintance how to get rid of it, and he said, "bleach." When I said that's fine for the walls but would discolor the carpet, he replied, "vinegar." Both worked.
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I would use borates/borax and/or ethylene glycol (anti-freeze) before I used bleach. Anti-freeze kills pretty much every living thing, and it has an afinity for water, which means it'll soak into wet/damp wood really well.
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I did a google and the sites I found that said bleach didn't kill wanted were sites that for just a few $$$ would tell you what would kill mold. I work in a microbiology lab and we use a bleach solution to clean and kill everything. But I think the problem is of a different nature. Take a nice fertile garden and you kill all the plants. They are all dead. But the garden is fertile. Other plants will grow back. So while bleach is very effective at killing the mold, it is not effective in preventing its return. The borax might be good for preventing it from coming back. It will also make the wood fire resistant.
Ronin
wrote:

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Ronald Cliborn wrote:

Bleach is inappropriate for an attic cleanup due to the extreme respiratory hazards involved. You are talking about large areas and large volumes of solution producing chlorine vapors. Unless great care is taken in using a respirator, you can set yourself up for lung damage. GOOGLE that.
http://www.bugspray.com/catalog/products/page1641.html is one supplier of a borax/glycol mix. Diluted, it is sprayable with a garden sprayer and easy to use in an attic. A respirator is still a good idea.
If there is extensive active mold growth, you may need to kill that first.
Some helpful sites on attic mold and attic ventilation: http://www.ronhungarter.com/ventilation_repairs.html http://www.hardyservices.com/remediation_2.dws http://www.allergybuyersclub.com/faqs/moldy-attic.shtml http://www.findingthemold.com/photos.html
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Its MOST important to fix the roof!
If you dry the area completely eventually the mold will die, without having to kill it directly.
although clean up is a good idea, but use care working with bleach.
I used that in a basement once with glass block windows, even with fans running I got sick afterward
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doh... $135/gal is expensive.
Make the equivalent for much less: http://alsnetbiz.com/homeimprovement/homemade.html
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Philip Lewis wrote:

but for me it turned out to be tedious, not wanting to cook the stuff on the kitchen stove. If it can work for you, go for it. Jim
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On 11 Feb 2006 14:17:24 -0500, Philip Lewis

Bora-care I bought from this web site a year ago..Not diluted 1 gallon $90.. (free shipping back then.. don't know about now..)
http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/cgi-bin/pestcontrol.storefront/EN/product/I065 Chuck (in SC) Powder post beetles .. worse than termites!..
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Chuck wrote:

http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/cgi-bin/pestcontrol.storefront/EN/product/I065
Bookmarked... Jim
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Mold isn't the problem. The problem is having or creating the conditions where mold can grow.
I live in Las Vegas. Until the last decade, mold was unknown here. Houses were simple framed houses with stucco. Very breathable. Very dry, and mostly drafty. Energy costs were low enough that being airtight wasn't required. We even used evaporative cooling which boosts the humidity quite a bit.
Enter, the era of new construction. Vapor barriers. Better insulation. Better taping and mudding. Really enclosing things in. I think that was where it changed, because this isn't NEW mold.
Yesterday, I woke up to a leaky hot water heater. They had installed it five years ago with no pan. So it died, and water came into my walk in closet and bedroom. I changed the heater, putting it up on blocks, and in a pan. We got out the wet/dry vacuums, and went to town. We vacuumed and vacuumed and vacuumed. Then put several fans. We will run the fans for a few days, and leave doors open during the day.
Point is, mold is like rust on a car. Not much you can do once it is in there except cut out the moldy/rusty part and toss.
It is far easier to prevent.
Steve
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