vertical tile adhesion

I am beginning a project for an outdoor kitchen. I want to use tile, but mostly in a vertical position for decoration. The substrate would get occasionally wet, but not a lot. Maybe not at all if the roof covers everything, and doesn't leak or drip any water.
What do I use to hold the tile onto the substrate? Do I use plywood or concrete board? Grout it? Liquid nail it and fill in the grout lines? A particular mix of grout?
I will be doing whole pieces of tile of all sizes, but may also nibble some pieces down to make a mosaic effect in some fields. So, the pieces would have to be put on in a horizontal position, then the whole board put up vertically. Or put on and held in vertical position.
Suggestions?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perhaps the exact same grout/adhesive materials and installation procedures as what goes on when tiling any household shower, which actually gets drenched by gallons of water daily and gets tiled while remaining vertical?
That'd be my idea, methinks.
AJS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

but
A
some
would
To answer some of your questions: Concrete board (Wonderboard), thinset mortar with latex additive, no Liquid Nails, use masking tape from one row to the next higher to keep it from sagging, 4.25" self-spacing tiles with little nubs on the edges, grout is applied days later when the mortar has dried. Home Depot sells a good book called "Tiling 1-2-3" which makes it all deceptively simple. --Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve,
I think I would use a concrete board substrate. However, you could instead use expanded mesh and concrete to create a mud bed (see professional brick and mortar supplier for explanation of this). It is a LOT simpler for a DIY'er to use concrete board.
I would use Versabond or something similar for adhesive. It is a concretious latex-added thinset mortar. There are no problems using this on a vertical wall. You can nail a temporary batter board up with just a few finish nails to support the first course of tile. Then just lay tile just the same way you would on a floor. It will not fall if your mix is good (stiff cake frosting) and you set the tiles properly. After the appropriate setting time (is it 72 hrs?), you can grout, then after letting the grout set (is it a week?) you can seal the grout. Whether to use sanded or unsanded grout is based on how wide your grout lines will be. It is not all that difficult, and a decent tile shop will give you all the advice you need to get you through.
Steve Johnson

some
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try posting this query at http://johnbridge.com/index.html You'll get some excellent--and expert--help there.

some
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.