Varnish question

This is a continuation of my last posting regarding my kitchen cabinets and how the finish seems to be coming off. Can anyone explain to me the difference between the different types of finishes that are sprayed onto cabinets. For instance are some more resiliant than others. Are some better at dealing with water? I know I don't have this right, but is there a type of varnish called a catalyzed? and a non-catalyzed? what is the difference between these two? I'm just trying to educate myself for the upcominig discussion with my cabinet guy and my contractor.
thanks.
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<< Can anyone explain to me the difference between the different types of finishes >> << For instance are some more resiliant than others >>
Yes. Some resin films are hard, others softer, more elastic
<< Are some better at dealing with water? >>
Yes. Spar varnishes, for example, are formulated for water/weather resistance, as are porch floor finishes, etc.
<< is there a type of varnish called a catalyzed? >>
Yes. Some resins may have a catalyst that is activated by exposure to oxygen in the air. Cobalt naphthenate with alkyds if you want to throw a few buzz words around.
<< a non-catalyzed? >>
Yes. This would be a type that cures for example, by absorption and reaction with moisture in the air. Other types may be like epoxies where two reactive components are mixed together just prior to application. There are others, of course. HTH
Joe
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Find out exactly what he used , but honestly he could have just thinned it out, whatever it was, screwing you and the varnish performance.
The real point is a quality job will not be affected by water drips, if yours is he screwed you, how or why is not realy important . But the fact that it needs to be re-done, or re-coated is. Take photos and get 4 or more bids in writing from real pros as to the problem and long term cure. Quality painters, cabinet and wood finishers are a start. And get the manufacturers name of the product he used and call the company. My boat oars, and exterior doors are varnished, boats and wood get varnished and can last many years, My doors will last 30+ in the shade, thay have lasted 10 so far and look new. If your kitchen was done right this would not be an issue for 10-30 yrs. Yes I have refinished alot of wood professionaly for many years.
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By doors I meant cabinet and exterior entrance doors that get rained on for months and hit with salt and snow in winter, and are fine, the product I used was 75$ a gallon. Whatever your hack did , and who knows it doesn`t matter, it was wrong.
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On 1 Dec 2004 20:39:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@excite.com (leon spinks) wrote:

There are all kinds of finishes applied to cabinets, even more kinds than 20 years ago. It can be confusing and there are over 20 distinct finish properties to consider. The best spray finishes that are resistant to moisture are catalyzed lacquer (CAB), conversion varnish, two-package polyurethane, aziridine, carbodiimide, and vinyl laquer.
A catalyzed finish is a crosslinked finish which cures with a chemical reaction rather than evaporating solvents. This is similar to mixing up a two-part epoxy adhesive. A non-catalyzed finish will generally take much longer to cure than one that is catalyzed.
For more information I recommend... "The Woodfinishing Book" by Michael Dresdner, Taunton Press
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On 1 Dec 2004 20:39:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@excite.com (leon spinks) wrote:

You might try alt.coatings.paint Though it's a quiet group there may be some that are more familiar.
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While others have already given you the direct answer to your question, you should be aware that cabinet manufacturers typically use finishes that are certified by an organization (the abbreviation starts with an I, I can not remember what it is) for use on kitchen cabinets. The finish must stand up to water, cooking grease or oil, hand oil, and heat exposure that one would expect in a kitchen. You would be surprised at how many hobbyist finishes do not meet the criteria. They fail way before a kitchen cabinet finish should.
Good Luck.

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Our cabinet manufacturer failed to put a decent finish on the bathroom and kitchen cabinets. He merely used something like Tung oil..something that doesn't repel water. The oil finish works fine for the living room and other places not subject to water, but otherwise is not a good approach. I think a better finish for bathrooms and kitchens is Verathane. I took all the cabinet doors and drawers from the bathroom to another cabinet maker. He applied the verathane finish (not by brush) and they look great. Most importantly, little splashes from he shower and sink do not harm the finish.

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