Vacuum Beater Brush attachment

Have a 10 year or older Sears Whispertone canister vacuum. The electrical connectors (male and female) that join the pole and beater brush attachment burn when I run the vacuum. I think it would be too much work to figure out how to replace these wires and unique connectors. Even if I did successfully replace them, there could be something is taking up too much juice in the beater attachment motor or something causing a short somewhere. Kind of interesting that it seems to running fine with the exception of the burning.
Would like to replace the beater bar attachment and the pole with the electrical connector. The salesman told me it would be about $125 just for the beater bar attachment. Of course, he's trying to sell me a new $400 model. This is too much. Any idea where I might find a used attachment for cheap money? Any other possible solutions would be welcome. Thanks!
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Have a 10 year or older Sears Whispertone canister vacuum. The electrical connectors (male and female) that join the pole and beater brush attachment burn when I run the vacuum. I think it would be too much work to figure out how to replace these wires and unique connectors. Even if I did successfully replace them, there could be something is taking up too much juice in the beater attachment motor or something causing a short somewhere. Kind of interesting that it seems to running fine with the exception of the burning.
Would like to replace the beater bar attachment and the pole with the electrical connector. The salesman told me it would be about $125 just for the beater bar attachment. Of course, he's trying to sell me a new $400 model. This is too much. Any idea where I might find a used attachment for cheap money? Any other possible solutions would be welcome. Thanks!
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Try www.totalvac.com
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I did that on an Electrolux once, but it only had two wires. I replaced both the male and female ends with standard electric cord replacement ends. I think it would depend on how much slack you have in the cord.

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How about just getting a new Hoover windtunnel instead. Probably do a much better job than the one you have based on my experience. Really 10 years is all you can expect from a vacuum these days. The Hoover windtunnels really do a good job. I had a fancy European head and sold it on ebay after trying the Hoover even though it won't last forever like the fancy one.

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In 2005 we literally threw a one year old top-of-the-line Hoover Windtunnel bagless machine into the trash we were so disgusted with it. Among all the things we disliked, at the top of the list was the fact that we could rarely get through vacuuming even one room before it would cut out due to the sensor that determines when the dust container and filter should be cleaned.
This seemed unreasonable, inasmuch as we vacuum regularly twice a week and cleaned all components of the container and filtration system at each session. We also replaced the filtration components twice is less than a year. The unit was purchased as Sears, and Sears repair could find nothing wrong.
We replaced it with a Bissell upright *with a bag*. It works like a dream.
On Mon 02 Jan 2006 11:09:42p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Art?

--
Wayne Boatwright **
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Consumer Reports recommends models with bags.
We have a central vac so only issue with us is quality of the head. Hoover windtunnel does a much better job then several others we've tried.

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On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 21:24:58 GMT, "Charlie S."

That would still leave half of your bad connection, possible the bad half, on the vacuum.
Is your connection warm? or is there sign of the rubber melting at the connections. If yes to either, it's almost certainly a loose connector and not a short.
I doubt there is a short, but the way to tell would be to take the attachement, turn it upside down, and use wires with alligator to connect a spare lamp cord to the prongs of the connector. If it has slots instead of prongs, stick nails into the slots, thin enough to go in easily and thick enough to require a bit of effort and not fall out. Make all the connectiosn and then plug the wire in without touching anything else electrical. Radio Shack sells a set of 10 wires with alligator clips on each end for maybe 4 dollars. They have many many uses. If they still sell lightweight and heavy weight, get the heavier one. The wire is different, the clips are the same.
But if the connector is hot or melting like I said above, or if the beater bar had been turning, or illuminated for more than 5 or 10 minutes since the problem startted, I might do this step because it would take me so little time, but you don't have to. If there were a short, the motor in the beater bar would have burned the motor out and sttopped long ago.
So, I would replace the connectors with standard ones, a wall plug and a small end of wire receptacle. From the electrical department anywhere. Or you can sometimes find a cord from another appliance that you don't use anymore. If is not enough available wire is showing, and there probably won't be, , open up the cover on either or both parts and solder or wire nut in more wwire. Tape it, or better yet if you plan to solder, put heat shrink tubing over the wire before you solder. If you've never used that, post back. But tape is good enough.
When you're done, the wire and the connector should dangle 1, 2, 3 inches below the pole, but that's the way they used to nake them.
Total cost, 2 to 6 dollars. More if you use heat shrink which so far is usually expensive.... Another 4 dollars for a small selection.
Of course, he's trying to sell me a new $400

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There is a considerable amount of soot on the connectors. So, there it's burning going on in there.

It has prongs. So, I guess I wouldn't need to do what you say about the alligator clips?

I imagine an electrical appliance store might have replacement wire receptcals for both ends. The beater brush side (male end)would be a piece of cake. The other side seems like I am going to have to figure out how to take the plastic holder off first. May have to cut the wire. If I do, then the wire might not be long enough. A easier solution might be to find out how much it would cost to replace the wire running along the pole. If it's only $10 or so, then it would be easier than shrink wrapping, soldering etc. I know I'll have to do the same for the male, beater brush side. Looking at that side. It seems a lot easier to deal with than the long, pole wire.

Going to check with the electrical supply store to find out what they can do for me. Once I start working, I might need some help using shrink tubing over the wire. Will write a separate post for that. Thanks for your help.

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On Tue, 03 Jan 2006 22:35:21 GMT, "Charlie S."

It has the same size prongs that plug into a wall? Then absolutely you wouldn't need the alligator clips.
And all that soot is enough to convince me it is the connection.

excesswords"themotor"

I had in mind using the kind of ends that lamps and walls use, that you can get at any electrical department of most stores. You dno't need big ones, because the beater bar uses less than the vacuum motor and both together only use about 10 to 12 amps. It's easy to find pretty plugs, and a bit harder to find pretty or tasteful one outlet receptacles that attach to cords, but they're around.
The beater brush side (male end)would be a piece

I'm sure it won't be but you can buy a foot or two of lamp cord, or any other cord. If you can't use what serves as a grommet where the wire goes through the case now, you can use 2 or 3 layers of electrical tape, or that tape they sell for the medicine chest, or anything with a little thickness.
? A easier solution might be to find out

You can use wire nuts. for 14 gauge probably. That's all you would need. If not that, then just wrap and tape. If not that then solder and tape (or heatshrink.)

I might not see it. Plastic electrical tape is good enough, or Johnson and Johnson bandage tape, and that's all I used until 20 years ago, and it was fine. But heatshink does a very pretty job. Heatshrink shrinks about 50% so get some that is no more than twiice the diameter of the wire and beefore wrapping the two wires around each other, slide a piece of tubing as long as the bare wire will be, and slide it on far enough that the bare wire shows out the end, and so that when you solder, the hot solder won't prematurely shrink the tubing. . Wrap the two pieces of bare wire to be spliced around each other nicely so there is no big bump, and then solder it. Anyone and many websites can tell you about soldering. After the solder cools, slide the tubing over the bare wire and hold a match about an inch below it, moving the match and rotating the wire, so that it shrinks at least enough not to move all by itself. If you do this for too long you can burn the tubing, so after it stops shrinking remove the match. I use wooden kitchen matches.

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Thanks for the help!
wrote:

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