UV for killing bacteria in water

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What's the cleanest (from the harmful crap like bacteria/lead/etc) bottled water anyone? Bay area tap water has high counts of bacteria & floride. And is it true a simple UV light will kill 99.9% of bacteria in water? TIA.
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On Aug 8, 2:31 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A good household water filter takes care of that. What idiots dont know about water leads them to buy bottled water, you can make better out of tap, which is what alot use to make bottled. You are first off panicking, second misinformed. 3rd over concerned x 10. I use a simple filter used by mc Donalds, the army, airlines, etc etc but I forgot its name because its not relavent in my life. Shacklee makes a great table unit, but you really need to learn and not panic. what people are getting sick from is Mexican fields , chillies, from field and sewage treatment plant flood runoffs. I was In mexico in Mechicuan Cotija, the sewage plant was in the valley with the crops, in the monsoon season it overflowed, do you need any more explanation. They got sick and did not know why. Instead Go buy a iphone and dont worry
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ransley wrote:

Hi, Filtering is good but to be effective it has to be maintained properly.
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wrote:

"What idiots don't know about water leads them to buy bottled water"
How come you always seem to come off so mean? Tony
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'cause he's a dickhead. that's why i plonked him over 6 months ago.
s
wrote:

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Steve,
There are effective UV water purifiers. These don't work on lead. I thought fluride was good thing. There are companies that will do fairly good water testing. Perhaps you should figure out if you have a problem before you look for a cure. Sorry, I have no opinion on bottled water.
Dave M
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I buy a UV light and stick it to my 1 gallon filter tank, how efficient will it be in killing bacteria?

I know.

Why? I have both a high floride level and bacteria counts.

I've tested my tap water. 90% of harmful stuff isn't present. Problem is 10% is present.
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Steve,

I buy a UV light and stick it to my 1 gallon filter tank, how efficient will it be in killing bacteria?
Consult with a pro since you already have your lab results. I can not tell you that some unknown light bulb will generate enough energy at the proper frequency to kill the bacteria nor do I know how long it would take to sterilize a gallon of water. You sound as if you want to do this yourself. I'd recommend heading to the library if there is a good one nearby or get help from the ag extension folks. Remember that the UV light may damage the filter tank if you are not careful and it will not be safe for humans.
I've tested my tap water. 90% of harmful stuff isn't present. Problem is 10% is present.
Take your lab results to a water conditioning company or two and see what they recommend to correct your water. If it's really expensive or you don't own the home use bottled water for drinking and cooking.
Dave M.
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David L. Martel wrote:

I know of no universal solutions. UV sterilizers are useful, I use one to process all of my water as it comes from my well, but you first need to understand it's limitations. Look at the energy/unit area required to kill various organisms
http://www.r-can.com/download.php?file_id59
Some are quite resistant, many organisms aren't listed here also.
A key issue is maintenance. The internal surfaces through which UV energy must pass must be kept clean. The water must be clear too. Some water, due to particulate matter has a very high extinction coefficient.
I doubt the effectiveness of small, under counter, UV sterilizers at anything but the very lowest flow rates.
As to materials, UV is attenuated by many glasses, plastic may be better, but will likely be damaged by UV. Quartz is best.
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I'm thinking about strapping a small UV light to my water filter reservoir, about a gallon big. That should do it. Doubt UV light will harm the plastic aside from the heat of the bulb. Thanks.
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wrote:

I'm thinking about strapping a small UV light to my water filter reservoir, about a gallon big. That should do it. Doubt UV light will harm the plastic aside from the heat of the bulb. Thanks.
Blattt! Wrong answer! LOL! Sorry, I thought that it would be a hoot. Anyway, UV light has damaging effects on nearly all plastics. Just think to the things that you've noticed had cracked or faded. I don't believe it will happen tomorrow but it will happen over time. There might be a site around which will assist with an estimate but there are a lot of variables at work. If the resevoir is inexpensive and easy to find you can go for it and see if it fails in the next couple of years.
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So does mere age accomplish the same thing to all material, a little UV just speeds the damage to some minute degree. Does that mean never buy water sold in clear plastic bottles? No. Sunlight comes through our kitchen for several hours every day for years and nothing plastic has noticeably cracked or deformed. Relax.

Yeah time will do this to everything. The faded part is UV induced but so what?

Bingo.
Nothing will fail in a couple years. Couple decades and it will be mainly due to age.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Right. You can put almost any (relatively clear) water in a clear plastic bottle, put the bottle in the sun for a few hours, and, presto, sterilized water.
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HeyBub wrote:

Hmmm, Plastic bottle? I wouldn't. I'd with glass bottle.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

I agree. But with 14,000,000 plastic bottles being produced each day, what are the chances?
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The glass used for making bottles also blocks UVC and even most UVB.
Then again, I have doubt about sterilizing water with a light source that does not exterminate plankton in shallow ponds.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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How effective? What % of bacteria will simple sunlight kill in a few hours? Thanks for the tip. I'll try that and retest it if you don't respond and hopefully post the results here.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There's bags of studies on this concept. Here's one:
http://www.icross.ie/publications/pdf/solar_disinfection_1.pdf
"In-vitro studies carried out at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland confirmed the bactericidal effect of solar radiation and showed that transparent plastic bottles allow passage of more ultraviolet light than do transparent glass bottles. Although glass transmits ultraviolet light more readily, the thinness of plastic bottles compensates for plastic's greater absorption of ultraviolet light. This finding suggested that non-returnable plastic bottles, which are widely available and even a source of pollution, may be used for the disinfection of drinking water."
The authors consider this experiment utilizing little brown babies in Kenya as a follow-up to an earlier study that relied on the heating effect of sunlight for disinfection.
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wrote:

A less desireable 'presto' is outgassing of the plastic. Haven't you noticed the taste of water left in the car for a couple of days?
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Yeah and mere heat was the big culprit. Do you know how hot it gets in cars?
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