Utility Knife

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Okay, a utility knife isn't the sexiest tool in the toolbox, but it's damn...errr....utile! I must have gone through 30 of the suckers over the years. Almost all of them were Stanley, some better than others. Most knives hold five extra blades and there are several ways to change blades. Some knives have to be opened with a screwdriver to change the blade. Others have a button you push to release the blade and a swingout holder for the spare blades, and the new blade is inserted in the front of the knife. Stanley must have had ten different versions of utility knives in all.
I had one I liked and it went walkabout, so I was using my less-than-favorite backup while I looked for a replacement. Then I ran across this Lawson autoloading knife on eBay http://tinyurl.com/mlcoh
What a great knife! The blade is removed by depressing a button on the front of the knife in the usual way when it is in the fully extended position. Then you pull back the blade retract button and a new blade is automatically loaded and ready to go. It takes less than two seconds to change a blade. I must have changed _thousands_ of blades over the years and wish I'd found this years ago.
It's a little larger and heavier than most utility knives, which is fine with me as it fits the hand better. It's also a bright yellow making it easier to locate when it's misplaced or dropped off of a roof into the ivy.
Anyway, just wanted to share that with anyone who might be interested.
R
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"JUST" a utility knife? I'm always lobbing the ends of silicon tubes and cutting stuff. I have tried dozens of 'new' ideas...and they always sucked. Back to ol' Stanley. Utility knives are a staple in my repertoire.
Thanks for the URL.
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Robatoy wrote:

You're welcome. I'm a bit of a tool whore, or aficionado, depending on your take on it, and I'm usually not too happy with Stanley's performance as the 900 pound gorilla of the industry. It's well known that back in the day Stanley would buy competitors and kill the newly acquired tool line off - even if the tools were superior. It was all about profitability. Can anyone say Microsoft?
Stanley's utility knives are all pretty weak. Some are such dated, uncomfortable designs that the only reason they're still made is because the production line is already set up.
R
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I'm with you. I have three Stanley 99Es and have no interest in changing to the 'new & improved' knives with the rubber handles and swiveling heads.
I also have an old Hyde knife I like but have been unable to find replacement blades because it requires the kind with a hole in the middle.
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RayV wrote:

Ray, I've found my local independent paint store to have the best selection of utility knives, including Hyde. In fact I bought a Hyde there last summer....so you might head over to such a store, if one exists in your area. It's a nice knife
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They also sell them on EBay, $1.30 for a five pack.

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Robatoy wrote:

Mine too. It's pretty much much part of my Saturday "uniform". I throw on the old jeans, the work boots and the utility knife in the back pocket.
It's kind of like an unbrella - If you don't take it with you, you're guaranteed to need it.
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I always have my utility knife with me when I am at home.
i
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I teach Technical Theatre and Set Construction. I always tell my students that the Stanley Knife is the most dangerous tool in the shop. The danger of the tool is inversely porportonial to the amount of noise it makes. I have seen a few horrific injuries with a table saw or a radial arm, but I have seen more injuries with a stanley knife than any other tool.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Interesting theory. I've always heard you have to watch out for the quiet ones, but I assumed they were talking about people!
My utility knife did a nifty self-filet on my left thumb around 3 AM one morning as I was trying to finish some work that was going to be photographed the next day. I just squeezed the cut shut, taped it up and kept working. It healed just fine...although there is a little less sensitivity in one area, so I know I got a nerve. Or the time the hook blade slipped while cutting carpet, went through my shoe and got my toe. Or the time... You get the idea.
R
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Yeah...we get the idea: you're a klutz! :~)
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wrote:

Is it story time? Oh boy!
So a month ago or so I'm screwing new hinges on some old redone cabinet doors. Damn soft metal screw snaps off. Gotta get it out. Screw can only go in this spot to match things. Start digging out so I can plug with wood. Using chisel,screwdriver, ice pick. OK, Mr. Icepick slips and I feel jab in left palm. Dammit, I instantly think blood is gonna get all over fresh white doors and I wanna finish this. Look at palm. Amazing. Hole is there. Nothing coming out. Great. But now I see blood dripping from the bottom of my hand. Still looking at hole in palm. Dry as a bone. WTF?. Flip hand over. There's the leak in the icepick exit hole on the back of my hand.
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--
Phil Scott
Ideas are bullet proof.
  Click to see the full signature.
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sounds to me that you are not using common sense in the use of the tool???
wrote:

That stanley jobbie is dangerous for sure... the handle might be one of the problems. I just got Husky's folding utility knife at home depot, thin, good looking, with a belt clip and a heavily grooved surface near the blade .. it doesnt store blades though. Blade changing is by two levers, one to unlock and the other to expose the blade, you just drop another one in.
not bad..but not as slick as the one you got with the magzine and slide out gismo.
This knife is small and safe enough folded with the belt clip that you are more likely to have it with you when you need one.
I carry a range of leatherman knives also, the bigger ones and the one with a small vice grip plier built into it. Useful for grabbing small nuts and bolts etc... I use those many times a day, but not for the same things a utility knife is good for.
Phil Scott

-
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I thought so, too. I have had guns for 50 years and I haven't killed anyone yet.
-- JerryD(upstateNY)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Count me among the injuries. Once, in my late teens I was cutting open boxes and accidently cut open my hand and wrist... about 15 stitches. Hit a vein just right and blood exploded out of my arm. Almost completely severed a tendon. I was actually pretty lucky. That wrist is still a little more fragile than the other. Yeah, those things will hurt you ;-)
Joe Barta
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Hyde makes a knife good for cutting boxes. The blade self retracts and you have to hold your thumb on it to keep the blade out. It extends enough to go through the corrugated, but not enough for the major injury of a regular knife. Our Workman's Comp insurance company was giving them out to promote safety.
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The most dangerous tool in the box is a "Bloody Mary." That is a utility knife that uses a double edge carpet blade. The blade stays out because it is meant to. You can set it to stay out at an adjustable distance so that you can cut carpet to a specific depth. I have seen more injuries with those, and they are always very bloody.
Just MHO from hours and hours and hours of laying carpet for conventions.
Steve
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Snip

I have switched after trying all the single blade knives to the "break off the end to renew the tip style utility knife". It has a slide button for positioning the blade that also locks the blade in place when you quit pushing or pulling. Best utility knife I have ever owned. Blades are cheap considering that you renew each blade 8 to 10 times and changing blades is a 10 second job.
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Leon wrote:

I use the same type. Mine is an Olfa with the rubber back for a bit more grip.
If you're really cheap (or have run out of blades) you can re-hone the blades a couple times.
Chris
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