Using Tub Spout with Diverter when there's no shower head

Folks,
I've got a new 8 inch tub spout with a diverter on it. I'd like to use it on my new tub (that lacks a shower.) Any chance that I can use a tub spout with a diverter in it even if there is no where to divert to? Are there any issues with it?
- Thanks,
Todd
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On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 20:30:22 -0700 (PDT), Todd

It should work fine. If you have a mixing valve with a shower line, it should be capped off.
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Just install a stub in the shower outlet and cap it off.
But why would you want a diverter if you don't need one?
The "handle to nowhere" would bother me.
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I don't _want_ a diverter. I happen to have an 8 inch tub spout that has a diverter. Can't find the same tub spout without the diverter. So I was wondering if there was a big problem with using it.
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Todd | 2009-06-19 | 10:09:16 PM wrote:

Worst case scenario: The water is on full force, and someone lifts the diverter.
If the diverter seals well (usually only on a new spout), then the water will just stop flowing. You will have to turn off the faucets before you can lower the diverter. The diverter might be difficult to lower because of static water pressure, but that will go away in a minute. The diverter might possibly drop by itself.
If the diverter _doesn't_ seal well, usually from water deposits, then you'll get a decreased flow from the spout. You'll probably still be able to raise and lower the diverter with the water on.
I'm assuming the shower pipe is well capped.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Todd wrote:

Maybe you can "defeat" the diverter mechanism. By that, I mean that maybe you can look inside the spout and see how the diverter mechanism works, and how it seals off the flow of water. There may be a way to remove or take out the plastic part that actually makes the seal.
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Todd wrote:

When someone drips the diverter valve it will close, and trap the water pressure behind in. Depending on how well it seals, how are you going to open it again? If you shut off the mixer valve, you'll trap pressure between the two valves, keeping the diverter closed.
Since water is not compressible, it doesn't have to leak much to keep this from being a problem, just thought I would mention it.
Bob
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