Using the push-in option (and no screw tighten) on outlets

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Personal experience here-- a lady at work has a mobile home she bought new about 8 years ago. First her fridge stopped working, so she pluged it into an extension cord to another outlet. I was out there doing a heater or a/c maint. checkout, so I looked into it. Fridge outlet was backstabbed. I think it was an end run. but not positive--this was several years ago. I cannot remember if the outlet also had screws which I used instead or if I replaced the outlet, but she has had no more trouble with it. Next time I was there, several more plugs and lights were not working-- same thing. Definitely would have been enough to convince me they were no good, except I already thought that anyway. Larry
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wrote:

I think he is looking for permission to use equipment that is questionable, but easier for the novice. A pro can twist a wire on the terminal rather fast
In the time spent trying to get approval, twenty connections could have been made.
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it costs a bit more but I love the kind you put the straight stripped wire in and tighten screw.
fast easy removable and worth the cost
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Uh, no, my basement is already wired and I used the screw terminals.
a
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Call it anecdotal, but like many others here, I've had multiple failures of back stabbers dating back many years. I doubt that you would never get any other view from any journeymen in the trade. Analyzing the problem from an engineering standpoint, it seems entirely logical that an overheated spring contact will loosen and fail. Seems to me to be pointless to do a study of the likelihood of that happening. The end user abuses the device, the device fails. The manufacturer will cheerfully send you another 79 cent part if you gripe about it, but why bother? The manufacturers are well aware of this weakness and make backstabbers noiw that must be screw tightened. My dimes worth...
Joe
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If you are collecting data my personal experience is do not use push in ever.
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I've only had problems with stab connections on a house with aluminum wiring. The wire is so soft that the spring eventually mashes the wire so flat that good contact is lost. In houses with copper wire it's never been a problem. That said, when I replace an outlet when a tenant breaks one or paints over it, I use the screws.
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Ashton Crusher wrote:

Backstabs were never approved for and never should have been used with aluminum wire. IMHO dangerous.
Still have a house with aluminum branch circuit wiring?
--
bud--


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Yeah, but it happened. A guy who worked with my father asked me to look at an outlet in his house that was not working properly. Some of the plastic was actually charred. It was fed with aluminum wire plugged into a backstab port. He's lucky it didn't get a little bit hotter and start something burning. I think I told him to check all the outlets in the house for the same problem (I was still in my teens at the time, which is a long time ago now).
My own house has copper branch circuit wiring and backstab-connected outlets and switches. I haven't found any problems I can attribute to them, but whenever I'm working on a switch or outlet for any reason, I'll switch to using the screw connections because I just don't trust the backstab ones. Or I'll junk the existing switch/receptacle and replace it with one that has rear-entry screw clamp connections, which I like better than the side screws.
    Dave
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