Using self leveling compound in bottom of cabinet

I have a rental property that had a plumbing leak (it's fixed). The base of the cabinet is particle board and has warped so that there's now about a 2" depression in the middle.
Replacing the cabinet would result in having to replace *all* of the kitchen cabinets to match, so this isn't going to happen.
I was thinking I'd use a self-leveling compound and then lay vinyl tiles over it. I could glue a piece of 1/8" plywood over the leveling compound if there may be a problem with the vinyl tile adhesive directly on the leveling compound.
Am I on the right track here? Any suggestions for a self-leveling product (preferably non-cement based) I can get at Home Depot?
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Cut out the particle board an inch away from each edge, leaving a nice ledge for a new piece of plywood, fiberglass sheet or the material of your choice and drop it in with a bit of water resistant glue. No mess, no waiting, half hour done and gone.
Joe
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Joe wrote:

If I go this route, why bother with the cutting?
There is a problem with this method. Due to the size of the cabinet opening, I cannot fit the replacement piece into the cabinet as a solid piece. I would have to split it across the short dimension. Doing this leaves no support along the split. I might be able to put a 2x4 underneath along the split, but I won't know until I cut out what's there and then it will be too late.
I'd rather try to work with what's there first.
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Dave wrote:

1. Split the new piece
2. Screw/glue a piece of 1x2 or 1x3 along the split on the bottom side of one piece so it overhangs the bottom by 3/4" or so.
3. Put in the piece from #3
4. Put in the other split piece. The batten will support it along the split. Screw to it if you like.
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dadiOH wrote:

Yeah, I like this idea. I'll just stain the plywood and save myself the trouble of laying tiles.
Thanks!
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wrote:

I agree, very simple.

I'm less sure about the stain though. And I see a problem with the original vinyl tile approach too -- dirt gets trapped in the joint lines.
I picked up some scrap sheet vinyl flooring for a few bucks and used that to line a couple of kitchen cupboards -- one under the sink and the other under the stove (pan storage). It worked great.
Oh, I also sealed the corners to prevent dirt becomming trapped there, using clear silicone caulk.
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Ok, so this is the approach I used. Because I wanted to leave as much of the original material as possible for support, I cut only a ~6" strip out of the center of the existing wood to accommodate the batten. I used 1x4 on the batten for the added support
I like the idea of the vinyl flooring, but I didn't have time to search around for scrap pieces. I just stained the plywood to match the color of the existing cabinets and called it a day.
I didn't glue the new piece in place. I wanted to be able to easily remove the platform in case there's another leak or whatever other reason I might have for needing to remove it. I cut it to pretty tight tolerances and screwed both pieces to the batten so it's a snug fit and won't move around.
Thanks for the suggestions!
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