Using Sakrete ? ? ?

I need to patch a 2 inch x 2 feet x 5 feet area of my basement concrete floor.
I will use the Fast Set Ultra Sakrete, but the web site gives confusing instructions on how to use it. Some questions:
1. Is this mix thick enough that it can be spread on a slight incline to drain, or does it seek its own level, like water?
2. There is something in the instructions about water rising, then evaporating or soaking back into the concrete. What does this mean?
3. There is something about "curing" which is very confusing. The instructions indicate I should spray the newly laid Sakrete, but it doesn't say how often.
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You can control the viscosity by the amount of water added. You shuld be able to slop enough for a basement drain.

When you trowel concrete, water will come to the top. Don't overdo the finishing. Let he water dry up, don't try to soak it up.

Curing is a long process. If it dried too fast, it is going to be weaker and subject to cracking. Best to keep the top surface moist for about 24 hours, maybe 48 hours on a bigger job. The hotter the temperature, the longer you should moisten. Concrete sets by a chemical reaction and creates some hat in the process.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 13:23:20 GMT, "Ray"

What's your hurry? Use the regular concrete mix
Mix it fairly stiff and it will stay where you put it., Proper hydration only requires that all the powder gets wet. You can tell by the color change. It can be stiffer than peanut butter.
Water will rise to the top as it sets since the concrete is heavier.
Cure it as slow as you can. I would cover it with plastic and keep it wet at least a week. Concrete only reaches it's design strength in 28 days. Insufficient curing will cause it to "spall" and the top will chip off.
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On Mon, 04 Sep 2006 10:35:04 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

On the tour of the Panama Canal in 1971, the guide said that the canal cement gets harder every year since it was built, about 1905 iirc. He said that if even a big steel ship hits the walls of a lock, it's the ship that gets damaged.
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Right. That's the difference between "design strength". and "ultimate strength". The strength of concrete approaches ultimate strength more or less asymtopically. It reaches design strength in 28 days, because they set up the design-tables by measuring the strength at 28 days.
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Do not use the fast set concrete Ive been finishing concrete for my whole adult life and I couldnt even keep up with the fast set for this situation. Dont forget its going to take you time to float this to the drain and it will take some time for you to do it right and look good. it sounds like you are patching an area that had some surface problems..make sure you get all the loose material out first I would even chisel out or cut an nice line around the entire surface edge (where the old an new are goin to meet) so you have a bit of a lip in this area because the area where the old and new meet (where the edege fades to nothing) is the first to fail after the patch...you all have seen it..... Paint the area with a bonding adheasive and pour the concrete you want to use the least amount of water as possible..does this mean the mix needs to be like gravel no add alittle bit of water at a time and when you think you are close (stay on the dry side to be safe) let the mix sit for about 5 min then remix it will probably be wetter than you thought. After gettig the mix right pour it in a little at a time the more dense (less air) you make this patch the stornger it is going to be. Float the top with a wood float first and then steel trowel if you do not have these buy a trowel with rounded edges (this will be eaiser to use) done full with it to much put it down then take a board (2x4nothing bigger) that will span the patch and ride on the existing concrete to screed the excess off...go slow. you can use the board to tamp a line in the concrete from where you want your water to start flowing..remember it doesnt take much so if you are concerned about appearance take your time and pretend like you are icing a cake its not going to dry on you any time soon. once you get the basic shape of your slope go over it and let it set up a bit for get about the bleed water you will probably not have any check a thick part and the edge with your finger to see if it leaves an impression slightly at this point just go over it a gain lightly cleaning up the trowel marks and making the final soothing pass..dont work the top to much get it nice and leave it. "spalling" is caused by over troweling and wetting new concrete to soon not by curing methods. if this is in your basement I would not wory about keeping it wet or even moist and DONOT COVER IT WITH PLASTIC this will most certianly ensure breakage in an inside environment and it is not necessary. If you feel inclined to keep it moist make sure it is hard first and inside I would use a couple of old towels or a sheet that was wet and rung out well and just lay it on top... One final thing pay very close attention to the edges where the old and the new meet for rapid drying and also the lip I mentiond above this is a very weak spot and if not done right will cause the whole thing to happen again..
Ray wrote:

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Ray writes:

You will not be able to get good results your first time. You need practice.
Thus, be prepared to give it your best, and when it is done, shovel it all out *before it sets*.
Repeat until you achieve acceptable results.
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