Using SAE 30R7 high pressure fuel line for drinking water

Is it ok to use SAE 30R7 high pressure fuel line for drinking water?
Also, where can I find what SAE 30R7 means? Google searches only turned up sites that said their products were compliant with 30R7. And the SAE web site (www.sae.com?) didn't seem to have a list of SAE standards.
I was in the middle of connecting a single handle kitchen faucet when I realized that I was going to have to disconnect the faucet again in the spring to replace the counter, and maybe remove the faucet to use a different sink. So rather than bend the lines again, I just used hose that I clamped in place.
Meirman
(followup on the lawnmower coming soon, I hope.)
Meirman
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Dear meriman:

It will provide an unpleasant taste. If you have chlorine in your water, it at least won't also act as a site for biogrowth. Hopefully the pressure rating exceeds your water pressure.
I'd recommend flexible hoses made for potable water.
David A. Smith
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With the endless options available in flexible supply lines that are aproved, why bother? Greg
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meirman wrote:

Try http://www.parker.com/ or http://www.aeroquip.com /
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Just get a flexible faucet line with proper plumbing compression fittings. The fuel line is probably as safe as lead pipe, but who knows what was left inside in the manufacturing process?

--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 16:37:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) wrote:
I can't understand specifying an SAE 30R7 fuel line for drinking water. If you feel uncomfortable get a stainless steel braided PTFE (Teflon) hose. PTFE hose can take higher press and temp. These are available in hardware store.
==============SAE 30R7 Fuel Line and Vapor Emission Hose Series SAE30R7
Gasoline and Vapor Emission Hose manufactured to meet SAE 30R7 specifications. Durable cover resists deterioration from oil, grease, heat and ozone and gives long service life. 4:1 Design factor. Tube: Black NBR Cover: Black Neoprene Reinforcement: Textile Spirals Branding: 3/16 in. ID FUEL/VAPOR LINE SAE30R7 (DATE CODE) Brand Description: Ink Brand - White letter color Temp. Range: -30 F to +250 F

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In alt.home.repair on Mon, 13 Dec 2004 20:19:25 -0600 Jim B

It's the other way around. I didn't specify 30R7. I looked for hose that was handy, and it was 30R7. I actually had in mine (auto) vacuum hose, but I didn't see any on display at Pep Boys, only this stuff, and next door, at NAPA or PAPA this is also what they offerred me. I wanted to get home so I took it. I didn't think about potability questions until after I was done or almost done.
So now it's installed and the question is whether I can drink from it as is, whether I should run the water for a few second before I drink from it, or whether somehow it is so bad that even that is insufficient.

I don't need higher pressure or temperature. Even vacuum hose would handle the pressure fine, but this is high pressure fuel line, used for fuel injection, which is what almost everyone has now. That's much higher pressure than normal water pressure.
My hot water temperature is set at 140. Thank you for printing the standard below. It says it is good up to 250.
Hmmm. Maybe you only meant as an aside that it had higher specs, and were just recommending something meant for drinking water. Thank.s

Great. I couldn't find anything on this.

Meirman
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Dear meriman:
(Lawrence

Run it for a few seconds before drinking. Replace it monthly, as chlorine and then biogrowth will make short work of it.

Teflon is largely inert in potable water, and doesn't provide places for biogrowth to form. Reinforced tygon would be a lot better than neoprene.
David A. Smith
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contact the manufacturer

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Only an imbecile would go looking for home water lines for a sink at an auto parts store and then start worrying about whether they are safe or not. There are plenty of cheap approved solutions availabe at the home center.
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