using polyfilla around a rawlplug

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Have just been drilling into a dividing wall in a 1936 terraced house in London, to hang up a cupboard in the bedroom.
What I'm drilling into is almost like soft sand. I guess it must be some kind of breeze block mortar that has deteriorated? The only thoughts I have is to pack some polyfilla around the rawlplug to fill in the hole and get some grip. Is that a good idea? Novice appreciates any advice on what best to do. thanks.
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"torge conrad maguar" wrote:

Unlikely to be breeze block in a 1936 property, and breeze block doesn't usually deteriorate with age. You are most likely drilling into the mortar between the bricks. You can't put filler around a wall plug and expect it to stick. The easiest and safest solution is to hang the cupboard in a slightly different lateral or vertical position; wall plugs should be fixed in brick.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

How many holes have you drilled, and are they *all* the same? If you've only drilled one or two it's possible that you've just been unlucky and hit a mortar joint. You could try moving your fixing points a couple of inches diagonally and see whether you then get something a bit more solid.
Actually, when you say a 'dividing' wall, do you mean the party wall between two houses or simply an internal wall between two rooms? If the latter, it could be a stud partition covered with lath and plaster. Does the wall sound hollow if you tap it with your knuckle? If it is this sort of wall, you'll need to drill a lot of small test holes to find where the structural timbers are, and then screw into those.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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Interesting questions. As Churchill said, the U.S. and the U.K. are "two nations divided by a common language."
So help this American understand what you're talking about, please. What is a breeze block? What is a rawlplug? What is polyfilla?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

A building block, typically measuring 18" x 9" - used in bits of walls which don't show - typically for the inner skin of a cavity wall. Original ones made of furnace ash and cement or somesuch. Current ones much lighter in weight, and with good insulating properties. Much faster to build than bricks since each block takes the place of 6 bricks.

Originally a fibre plug, inserted into a drilled hole in brickwork to allow a screw to be screwed in. Rawlplug is/was a trade name - but is now used generically for any such plug. Modern plugs are made of plastic.

A powder which, when mixed with water, makes a plaster-like substance for filling cracks in walls.
HTH!
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Cheers,
Roger
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Gotcha. We call that a cinder block (even though they're *now* made with concrete), but ours are 16" x 8".

Gotcha. We use the same things here, but I have no idea what they're called.

I guess that's a trade name, too?

Yeah -- thanks!
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Poly**** is a the genus name for a proprietary collection of gooey stuff; including -but not limited to;- Polycell - wallpaper paste Polyclens - paint brush cleaner Polyfila - plaster for filling minor cracks. holes in plastered walls PolySmooth - plaster for skimming larger areas --- plus lots of others ... Brits have a tendency to use a 'specific' brand name-item for the generic; thus we 'hoover' the carpet - even using a Dyson.
--

Brian




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Happens here, too. The most prominent examples I can think of are: - Facial tissues (for blowing one's nose, or wiping one's eyeglasses). Everyone here calls them Kleenex. Nobody ever asks for a "facial tissue". - Photocopiers. Most commonly referred to as Xerox machines, even if made by Canon, Rico, etc. - Carbonated cola beverage. Usually called a Coke. Even if it's a Pepsi.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On 12/18/06 09:14 am Doug Miller wrote:

The last of these is regional: in some parts of the USA they are all "coke," in others all "soda," and in yet others all "pop."
Perce
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I remember the first time we went to a restaurant after moving from Illinois to Indiana. My brother, nine years old at the time, wanted -- better describe this very specifically here -- an orange-flavored carbonated soft drink. In Illinois, that is (or was 33 years ago, at any rate) called "orange soda". So that's what he ordered.
Boy, was he surprised when his "orange soda" arrived in a huge glass with two large dollops of vanilla ice cream floating in it.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I was 19, sitting around the dinner table in Tucson, with my aunt's neighbours... "to see the nephew from England".
We were talking about taking a hike on the Sunday, and one of them remarked how she had difficulty in waking up on the weekend. So I leant over and casually said "shall I come over an knock you up then?".
Sudden silence.
--
Tony Williams.

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I guess you learned pretty quickly that that phrase has a *very* different meaning here. <grin>
When sitting down to dinner, we habitually put "napkins" in our laps to protect our clothing from spills, and to provide something to wipe our hands on. As I understand it, you use "serviettes" for that purpose, and "napkins" for something altogether different.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

I believe the phrase "keep your pecker up", which in England is meant to extol people to be cheerful in the face of adversity, has a very embarrassing meaning in the States.
A few years ago we took a train trip across Canada and fell in with a group of Americans. By the end of the trip I had them calling the railroad: the railway, switches: points and ties: sleepers. Oh and the engineer was the engine driver.
--
Keith Willcocks
(If you can\'t laugh at life, it ain\'t worth living!)
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Keith Willcocks wrote:

And Americans drive on the parkway whereas we park on the driveway.
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Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney
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Bruce wrote:

I got a reprimand for saying that 'the law is an ass' on one US forum.
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On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 09:53:33 +0000, Bruce

Except on the Garden State Parkway, where you're actually parked, just wishing you were driving.
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Goedjn wrote:

Sounds very much like the M25 around London - often referred to as largest car park in the UK
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Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney
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wrote:

I live very close to the busiest bit of the M25 (Surrey/Heathrow section) and we refer to it as a rotary car park.
Having said that, my wife and I drove from New Hampshire to JFK Airport in New York in the summer and the last 10 miles made the M25 look like Brands Hatch or Silverstone. It took 3 hours and we were told that that is perfectly normal on a Sunday.
--
Keith Willcocks
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Keith Willcocks wrote:

Makes me quite glad to be up here where the only "hectic" time is when the ferry is due to arrive. Sometimes there are as many as 7 or 8 cars waiting in the queue.
--
Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney
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On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 16:23:30 +0000, Bruce

Is that the one with the interchange described in the book _good_omens_ as "a prayer wheel to satan"? (or maybe that was _sympathy_for_the_devil_..)
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