using granite countertop material as flooring

I have come into possession of a large quantity of discarded countertops and want to put it down as flooring. I know there are design/aesthetic issues, I promise to handle them wisely. My main concern is: HOW DO I GLUE THE POLISHED SIDE DOWN TO PAINTED CONCRETE SLAB FLOORS? I'm going to assume there is an easy answer but whatever answer you have I'd appreciate. The floors are painted with Duron's epoxy reinforced acrylic floor paint. It has great adhesion. Do I have to sand it off or prep it in some way? I'm putting polished side down so we don't kill ourselves (the unpolished side is wonderfully rough). What do I need to do the surface (if anything) to prepare it for the adhesive/mastic/thinset? I am willing to put adhesive down (epoxy, etc.) if that is best choice. Thanks
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dno wrote:

Do some web research on granite tile underlayment materials.
You need a slip layer between the slab and the concrete slabs as concrete and slabs have different rates of expansion. There are PE waffles, cork, and several engineered solutions. Some of these also help dramatically reduce the Click Clack as people with hard soled shoes walk across them.
And just why are you so concerned about the polished side???? Almost every commercial and residential application of granite tile uses polished granite. Sole exception being in bathrooms where floors can and do get regularly wet. For that area, a honed, or flamed surface is great. Travertine honed gives WONDERFUL traction when wet and the light ot medium golden color gives a very warm appearance to baths.
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Robert Gammon wrote:

Thank you for the response, I was hoping for informed advice. Are you saying that I can lay it on the underlayment without having to anchor it more substantially, like with a glue/mastic?
I want the rough side for the look too, not just out of safety concerns. Of course smooth side down creates issues that don't need to be created...
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dno wrote:

Yes, the trend appears to be away from polished surfaces, at least according to the conversation I had with a tile/slab contractor that I met with this week. As beautiful as the top surfaces are, I wonder why you want the dull gray look of the bottom side.
You do want an adhesive, thin set mortar designed for stone tiles. This is true even for the very large pieces you are likely to be installing. As think as these pieces are 2cm is common, if the floor is the tiniest bit not flat, the tiles will crack over time. It is important to get an underlayment that will but level the floor somewhat, and provide a slip layer so that as the tile and the slab expand and contract at different rates, the torsion is dissipated in the slip layer not in the tile. Cork is a wonderful product for this, but do some research on the web for stone tile underlayments to see what is available and what you might be able to afford.
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I think modified thinset will do the job since the subfloor is a slab with no deflection issues (unless it itself cracks, that would probably transmit to the surface if you use a solid binder like thinset).
Such a heavy material on such a solid base would probably sit just fine using mastic or even construction adhesive. Depends on the size of the chunks you end up using. Use thinset if smaller.
I suggest cutting into squares. I think this saw will handle a piece of counter material 24" deep x 0.75" thick http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber386
I got this saw and it cuts very fast and easy but it is big and hard to store. It's on sale from time to time.

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pipedown wrote:

Thank you for the response. So you think thin set or adhesive will work over the paint?
Thank you for the saw information.
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Some kitchen design shop go belly up, or are they remodeling a bunch of fancy apartments?
Is the concrete floor flat? How will you handle doorways that open over the new surface? Counters are pretty thick and heavy- if you can cut the salvage material very square, you can probably just lay it dry like a brick patio, assuming you can provide a strong enough border to keep it from sliding. Then just grout the joints with something moisture-proof.
aem sends...
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ameijers wrote:

No, I salvaged the material myself. Doorways can be cut down but most fit, I tested already.
Are you suggesting laying it dry? Without any adhesive to the slab?
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