using crimp-on electrical connectors

Doing wiring around the house with small (20-16ga) wires on the cars, mowers, etc, I would like to use the crimp-on connectors.
When I squeeze them hard with pliers, the wires still have a tendency to slip out.
Is there a better way to do install those crimp-ons than using pliers?
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A crimping tool would be high on my list.
A good quality crimper is far better than pliers.
-- Oren
"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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Crimps can be incredibly secure. The problem is finding a good crimping tool. The ones sold at places like Home Depot or Lowe's are crap. They usually have two slim, flat jaws that do nothing but squeeze the connectors in a way that's not much better than pliers. What you want is a tool that has a groove on one side that holds the crimp in place, and a "tooth" sort of thing on the other that makes an indentation in the connector, almost as if you'd pressed the connector with an awl whose point had been rounded off.
I don't have time at the moment to find you a link, but poke around at www.panduit.com for crimp tools. If you find some, but they don't show a closeup picture of the tool's jaws, let me know and I'll post a picture. The tool I have came from Mac Tools, but a very quick look at their site suggests that they don't make them any more.
By the way, Panduit makes the best crimp connectors in the known universe. No matter how expensive they seem, they are worth the money, especially if you're obsessive-compulsive and have nightmares about electrical failures harming your family.
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rb wrote:

connector.
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I normally use channel locks to "crimp" it, then I solder it. Mine never slip out.
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You solder after putting on a crimp connector? How??? Or, are you crimping bare wires, and then soldering? How do you cover the connection after soldering?
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What I do, I slide the plastic sleeve back onto the wire before I crimp.
Then, I solder.
Slide the plastic sleeve forward.
Slip on heat shrink tubing.
Heat shrink the tubing.
Couple layers of electrical tape over the heat shrink.
Duct tape over that.
Dry ( unlubricated ) condom rolled over the duct tape.
Plastic bread bag goes over all this.
Rubber bands to hold the bread bag.
Nylon tie straps to hold the rubber bands.
Stainless steel automotive hose clamp to hold the nylon tie straps.
Never had this fail, once. Now, what were we doing?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Tape. Amateur.
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AAAUUUGGGHHH!!! I've been revealed as an amateur!
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Christopher A. Young
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On Jun 29, 7:54 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

This can't possibly work. You'd need to put a hole in the condom to slip it over the wires and then you'd end up with a bunch of little baby wires running all around the place.
I think you made that all up.
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Yeah, a hole in the condom allows electrons to swim out.
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Christopher A. Young
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Use the kind of pliers that are designed for crimping. Something like the Sta-kon WT111M . Also use the correct size connectors and stranded wires. They will not hold very well on soild wire.
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rb, 6/28/2007,6:30:23 PM, wrote:

In another life I was an electronic technician and had all the tools I needed for making such connections. Of course the preferred method is to solder the wires and cover with heat shrink. However I know using butt splices are more convenient. Also if you use a terminal lug to connect the wire to a screw you will need to crimp on the connector.
As has been said you should use the proper crimping tool but sans that there are pliers with a notch in them that will hold the splice and a tooth on the other side to press the opposite side down into the wire for a strong, secure connection. One such type I've had for years and find invaluable is the Thomas & Betts Multi-Crimp Tool. Here is a knockoff for $10 that should be in everyone's tool bag. It's the second tool down the page. http://www.starkelectronic.com/eclcrimp.htm and a close-up picture here:
http://www.eclipsetools.com/ProductPics/Latest%20.jpegs/100-039.JPG
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That's a good tool. It appears to have different size channels to match various crimp sizes. Without that arrangement, a crimp tool is almost worthless.
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On Fri, 29 Jun 2007 14:25:07 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Next to the picture, it says "The actual tool looks different now. It is thinner and has only one crimp cavity"
I know they don't meet pro standards but I have 2 or 3 of these from JCWhitney http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/Search?catalogId 101&storeId101&sku=crimper&searchbtn.x=0&searchbtn.y=0
It's 4.50 now, and it has 2 or 3 crimping cavities, 5 or 6 wire stripping cavities, 5 screw-in screw cutting holes, and wire cutters at the front end.
10 or 15 years ago they were selling a plastic comnpartment box of assorted crimp-on connectors, along with one crimper, for something like 3 or 4 dollars, iirc. They would have incredible discounts sometimes.
It's made from flat-stock, and certainly isn't Deluxe as it is labeled, but it's worked fine.
I don't always crimp, sometimes I solder, even if it melts the plastic sleeve, and I think sometimes I have crimped and soldered.
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when i criimp them on,i usually solder it also. i dont like comebacks.
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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