Using A Not-Correct Sparkplug in Snowblower ?

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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 11:31:56 AM UTC-5, Terry Coombs wrote:

BS. Show us one snowblower engine that's been burned up by using a spark plug with the wrong heat range for a few hours. It doesn't happen, despite your attempt at FUD.
.
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On 1/27/2015 12:20 PM, trader_4 wrote:

I totally agree, unless the new plug is longer put it in and move the damn snow. Sometime in the future and at your convenience you should probably grab the correct plug.
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 11:17:59 -0500, Stormin Mormon

burns off and the insulator is white. With leaded gas sometimes the tip would go yellow/green if there was too much sulphur in the gas. Semi-conductor (Lead sulfide?) plugs don't fire too well. (ever heard of Galena? it was used as the detector in a lot of old "cat's whisker" crystal radios of yesteryear.)

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On 1/27/2015 1:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

day. Yes, I'd heard of galena. Some times there was enough of an impurity on the surface, you could use small wire, and make a sort of diode out of it. was too much sulphur in the gas.

- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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IGot2P wrote:

It appears neither of you knows much about IC engines . I stand by my statement , it is a possibility . Might not be likely , but possible . "Hey Bubba , these here plugs iz only a little shorter than the plugs we took outta your Triton motor , less use 'em !"
--
Snag



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Most small engine plugs are similar. Especially if they are either 2 or 4 cycle types. If the heat range is not hot enough they may foul out after a while and need cleaning. If too hot they may burn the piston. Not sure how much hotter or colder they need to be and how long the engine would need to be ran to do either. If much shorter the spark may not be in the right place for the engine to run or run very well. If it were mine, I would check to see if the part in the cylinder was longer. If not, I would try it and change it out at the first time I could.
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The gap will not effect the heat range. It mainly determins if the engine will run or not run. Too far open and there will not be enough voltage to jump the gap and you mght as well not have the wire connected to the plug. Too close and there may not be enough spark to ignite the fuel.
If you look at most plugs of the same general type, the heat range is sort of determined as to how long the part that is outside the cylinder is. That is the usually white material between where the wire is and the top of the engine.
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:25:08 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

heat path from the center electrode in the cyl to the plug shell - so the length of the insulator INSIDE the cyl.
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:08:04 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

One thing I never understood about spark plugs, is WHAT DETERMINES THE HEAT RANGE? Is it the length of the spark, (but that would be the gap), or a built in resistor to cut down on the spark voltage, or what?
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

My understanding is how much plug body retains heat. Nowadays we have Platinum or Iridium plugs which lasts LONG time. I usually roast old plug laying on the rnage heating element. The when it is still pretty hot install it ahs try to start the engine.
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On 1/27/2015 7:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Been a LOT of years, but IIRC it's the length of the ceramic insulator in the center. Of course, tomorrow I'll try and remember to web search the question.
Longer insulator is hotter plug.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:27:36 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

length of the heat transfer path from the tip to the shell. That is the CENTER tip. The ground terminal is "cold" as it is virtually connected to the head.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You can say it until you're blue , some just can't grasp the concept of heat transfer path . Shorter path equals colder plug , longer is hotter . Ever seen the top of a piston subjected to extreme pre-ignition ? I've seen holes ...
--
Snag



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wrote:

I have too, What you are possibly not catching is HE is saying it is the length of the insulator OUTSIDE the engine - from the shell to the terminal. He is WRONG - I'm sure you will also agree. It is the insulator INSIDE the cyl.
Remember - I've been a mechanic for decades and taught motor vehicle technology at the post secondary and secondary level.
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I admitt I was wrong in my statement about the outside of the plug. The outside of the cylinder part of the plug does get rid of some of the heat,but it is mainly the part that is inside the cylinder of the plug that determins the heat range.
I mainly had it backwards to start with.
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The heat range is how hot in temperature the plug gets. Mainly the length of the length of the plug sticking out of the engine to the plug wire. Too cold and carbon or other junk builds on the plug usually shorting out the spark. Too hot and the engine will not shut off when you cut the power to the plug off. Makes it a diesel type engine.
The resistor part is to help supress electrical noise that you may hear on a radio. Same as resistor wiring in a car that goes to the plugs.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Isn't that called electrode projection?
Too

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wrote:

Not quite. A ptojected nose plug sticks the tip of the electrode out into the cyl where the air/fuel charge helps cool it, giving a wider heat range. The thermal path between the tip and the shell still determines the heat range. - but Ralpf has his plug science Bass Ackwards.

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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:45:31 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Nope You almost got it right. See my other posts.\\

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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:45:31 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

I've been trying to get a radio for my snow blower, but I can't find one with Sirius also.
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