Used Aluminum Ladder Question?

Gents;
My neighbor has an old 40 foot aluminum extension ladder that he has stored for a number of years in his garage. He has offered to sell it to me if I want it. My question is this: Assuming I have to replace the ropes, what would a fair price be for a used ladder of this size?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think things are worth what someone is willing to pay for them. Many things cost a lot when new and are practically worthless when used. I use a 28 foot fiberglass ladder that cost me close to $400 when I bought it. Next year when I get a new one, I'm hoping I don't have to pay to get rid of it. Offer him what it's worth TO YOU

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
chech home depot On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 16:23:37 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Among other things, ladders are rated by the weight they can safely hold. The following copied from a web page. a.. Type III, Light Duty / Household Use (200 pound load capacity): The lightest rating, intended for short ladders that will be used very infrequently and for very light-duty work. b.. Type II, Medium Duty, Commercial Use (225 pound load capacity): For light duty use around the house -- painting, cleaning, light repairs. c.. Type I, Heavy Duty, Industrial Use (250 pound load capacity): Good all around rating for household or commercial use. Sturdy enough for just about any use. d.. Type IA, Extra Heavy Duty/Professional Use (300 pound load capacity): The highest rating. Very sturdy, and designed for rugged use in any capacity on commercial or industrial sites. Remember that the more highly rate a ladder is the more it weighs and the more it costs I used to have 24 foot one (that's two 12 foot sections that overlap and give you about 20 feet full extended. When it is extended quite a bit, there is a minimum amount of overlap which makes it a whole lot more flexible. It can be a real thrill standing 12 feet of the ground on a bouncing ladder.
Two other considerations. You can use the as two 20 footers and get stands to support a plank to act as a scaffold. Do you really need a ladder that big?
Try it out first. Check for a rating sticker. See how heavy it is. See how well the sections slide together. See how well the sections lock together.
It's your neck that you will put in jeopardy. Know what you are getting into.
When I moved from a two story house to a single story seven years ago, I sold my old ladder for $50
Charlie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 17:15:04 -0400, "Charlie Bress"

As you said. Short ladder. Based on what I've seen of type III ladders, I'd never climb a fully extended 40'er. Like to think they don't make em.

Yea & the heavier duty they are the harder they are to lug around.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Along the same lines, I'd rather climb a barely extended 40' ladder than a fully extended 28' to get to the same height.
I'm not afraid of heights, but I want something really solid under me to get to the top. PITA to lug and set up though.
Where I work there is a 220 foot brick smoke stack. A crew did some work on it and they stack wood ladders one atop the other all the way up. The ladders are lashed to each other and around the stack. No way would you get my ass up them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was just looking around for such a thing, but couldn't find it. Where might I find these stands?
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably at a roofer supply place
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob_M wrote:

If you buy it, take a few seconds to spray the bottom rung with some orange Day Glo paint.
I've done that to every ladder I own. It's stopped me from mistaking the second rung for the bottom one and too often taking my final step down onto thin air rather than the ground.
Jeff (Admitted klutz with regard to ladders.)
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

About half of what a new one is today is a good starting point
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

bright daylight, and look for any bending or damage, popped rivets, fatigue cracks, and so forth. If any visible damage other than rotted rope, pass. New ones are only a couple hundred at the big-box. If you have any close power lines to your house, fiberglass is a better bet. If your power drop is roof versus buried, be very careful around it with an aluminum ladder. Test drive the ladder- you can raise it even without the rope. Do the sections slide smoothly, or bind? Lean up against house in a safe spot, and climb roof high. Do <you> feel safe on it, or is it all bouncy? What is the rated weight for the ladder? - for a larger fellow like me, many cheaper ladders are at rated weight even if I am not carrying anything.
(Shopping for a 16-20 foot myself, to go with this house I just bought. Spent many hours on ladders as a much lighter kid, but the one I owned vanished 3-4 moves ago along with the rest of my kid summer job tools...)
aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.