Use deep discharge marine battery as emergency power source?

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I've been wanting to buy/use a marine battery as a 1vdc power source for emergencies such as ice storms etc
Thing is I don't know if there exists a "box" that will contain he battery yet allow USB and 12vdc "ports" to be obtained from it?
Bottom line...does there exist a "box" that will hold a heavy battery such as this yet maybe have internal connections for USB charging ports and still allow hook up of 12vdc car "trouble" lights for home lighting?
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On Jan 30, 11:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I've never heard of such a box, but if you can't find one you could make one yourself fairly easily using:
An ordinary battery box A couple of cigarette lighter outlets from auto parts store A 5V voltage regulator, plus maybe a small heat sink from Radio Shack A USB extension cable
And even if such a box does exist, I bet the above might be a lot cheaper.
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On Jan 30, 11:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I suggest you make a box and put some cigarette lighter outlets in it. You can get adapters for those that have usb 5 v outlets in them. I have one that has 2 usb outlets. Make the top removeable so you can connect your charger.
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This is done all the time for amateur radio emergency work. Usual deal is to get one of the marine battery boxes, or something that will fit, put in a couple of 12 cigar lighter sockets, maybe a switch, fuses, and pilot light, and you are good to go.
Mine is a "sportsman's dry box" from the local sporting goods store, sockets from Radio Shack, and charger, etc., from local hardware store. I also have a microphone clip on the end so that I can set my radio on top, and keep the microphone from flopping about. For smaller endeavors, get one of the SLA gel cells like are used for alarm systems or emergency lighting systems. Depends on what current draw you need.
As for USB stuff, there are USB adapters that plug into a car cigar lighter. I have enough space in my box for the charger to live, and a couple of odds and ends of cables, adapters, etc. I also have one of those plug-in volt meters to check the state of charge of the battery.
/paul W3FIS
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Does there exist a box pre-built with all the connectors and internals for this?
If not, how exactly do you mount the cigar lighter sockets in the plastic battery box?
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Easy to build, really. Nothing more than hand tools.

I happened to have a 1 5/32" Greenlee punch from my vacuum tube days, but use a "rat tail" file or taper drill/reamer to get the right size. Measure the OD, then scribe the right sized circle on the box with a compass. Cut/file to the size of the desired hole. Try to make it a tight push fit.
I secured it with the glue from a "hot glue" gun. Very handy gadget. The "glue" appears to be polyethylene, and sticks pretty well. You can cut it loose with a sharp knife, if you need to.
Simple holes for the switch, pilot light. Fuses were "in line" with the charger pig tail. Use crimp fittings to connect to the back of the cigar lighter socket. Ditto with the switch -- get the right kind for that.
To block in/secure the battery, I cut some pieces of 1" pine to fit, drilled holes through the side of the box, and secured with some pan head screws. I do need to put a dab of silicon caulk under the screw heads for better weather seal perhaps.
/paul W3FIS
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On Jan 30, 11:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I don't know why you need 1 volt supply.
A "marine" battery is one with a carrying strap. It does NOT have to be deep discharge.
greg
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It only has to be deep discharge if that is what you intend to do with it. Which is exactly what the posters requirement is. Marine batteries come in several flavors: deep discharge, starting, and dual purpose. What's critical is to get the right type for your application and the poster has that correct.
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wrote:

to take more vibration than an automotive battery, and is generally somewhere between a common SLA (starting, lighting, and Accessory) battery and a deep charge battery in construction and capability.
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<stuff snipped>

FWIW, I've always known SLA to stand for "Sealed Lead Acid" battery.
I think what you mean is usually called a Starting-Ignition-Lighting (SIL), aka the typical car battery. They should not be used where they will be discharged to lower than 50% of the amp-hour rating because the plates will become damaged.
SLA's are the deep DIScharge batteries found in UPS's, golf carts and wheel chairs and usually have no caps or covers for the individual cells as car batteries do. They are often called "gel cells." They can tolerate much greater discharges than car batteries without damage, although it's recommended that they not be deeply discharged too often because they too can suffer damage when completely discharged. They need to be sized correctly for the application.
-- Bobby G.
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On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 15:26:45 -0500, "Robert Green"

Also called that. Perhaps more commonly.

When's the last time you saw a car battery with individual OR removeable caps?????

cells as well as "Valve regulated" sealed cells, and there are "starved electrolyte" cells. The common high output deap cycle lead acid cell today is the starved eletrolyte AGM battery, which can be shipped by air and is not considered as "hazardous material" when it comes to transporting or handling. They are very resistant to sulfating, and SOME can even take crazy extreme charging currents.
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<stuff snipped>

Yesterday, when I checked the condition of both my car batteries in anticipation of the coming big freeze. Perhaps things are different in the Great White Way. My battery kit contains a small bottle of sulfuric acid, a larger bottle of distilled water, a voltmeter and a "turkey baster" hydrometer to test the specific gravity of the battery fluid.
-- Bobby G.
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Exactly. I have a Bosch car battery in my car, installed last year, that has caps on the cells too.
The other thing that just isn't so is this:
"The common high output deap cycle lead acid cell today is the starved eletrolyte AGM battery, which can be shipped by air and is not considered as "hazardous material" when it comes to transporting or handling."
True AGM are one type that is available, but this implies they are the whole market or that it would be uncommon to find a deep cycle that isn't AGM. In the marine market there are flooded cell deep cycle marine batteries that are widely used. They are less expensive than AGM and I would expect there are lots of other applications they are used in for similar reasons.
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Exactly. I have a Bosch car battery in my car, installed last year, that has caps on the cells too.
The other thing that just isn't so is this:
"The common high output deap cycle lead acid cell today is the starved eletrolyte AGM battery, which can be shipped by air and is not considered as "hazardous material" when it comes to transporting or handling."
True AGM are one type that is available, but this implies they are the whole market or that it would be uncommon to find a deep cycle that isn't AGM. In the marine market there are flooded cell deep cycle marine batteries that are widely used. They are less expensive than AGM and I would expect there are lots of other applications they are used in for similar reasons.
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I have a deep discharge marine battery that's got caps and liquid electrolyte. From what I understand the plates are thicker and have less total surface area than a car battery. The car battery is designed primarily to provide maximum amperage for cold cranking and thus needs much more electrode surface area than one meant to provide moderate current continuously, as in a marine trolling application. Batteries with access caps are almost always meant to be used in one position whereas the SLA batteries can usually operate in any position without danger of sulfuric acid leaking out.
If I recall correctly, the problem with deep discharging car batteries is that lead will drop off the plates and start to build up at the bottom of each cell, eventually bridging the electrodes and shorting that cell out. Depending on what site you're reading from, that can happen either after a few deep discharges or 30 or more.
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue, 1 Feb 2011 08:37:56 -0500, "Robert Green"

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On 01/31/11 03:26 pm, Robert Green wrote:

The only Golf Cart batteries (GC2, 6-volt 220Ah) I have found recently are *not* sealed, unfortunately, which makes me hesitate to use a pair of them as an *indoor* emergency power supply for my amateur radio station: (a) they will need to be topped up regularly; (b) they will emit hydrogen under charge, with its explosive propensity.
BTW, SLAs can be gel cells, AGM (absorbed glass mat) or be -- as I understand Optima batteries to be -- liquid-electrolyte batteries with catalytic recombinant components.
Further, I have seen "Marine Starting," "Marine Deep Cycle" and "Marine Dual Purpose" batteries.
Perce
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On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 19:00:05 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

loss by better than 90%. I had 8 GC2H batteries in the old Fiat ElectraMobile
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On 01/31/11 08:50 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Where are such caps available? Google turned up just a few references to such things but no links to vendors.
Perce
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On Tue, 01 Feb 2011 06:45:52 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

that sold me the batteries.
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On 1/31/2011 10:26 AM, zek wrote:

Hmmmm? Funny, the car battery I put in my garden tractor has a strap. It's not a marine battery.
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