Use 2x4 or 2x6 for ceiling rafters

I'm building a patio roof (16'wide x 10'deep). I'm using 2x6 (10') for roof rafters. The ceiling, from ledger (attached to house) to beam is 7 feet. I'm using 16'' spacing for my rafters. I am trying to decide whether to use 2x4 or 2x6 (southern yellow pine) for the ceiling rafters. I will be putting up a plywood (thin) ceiling, and may later want to put up a swinging chair made for two people. Attaching the chair to the ceiling rafters with an eye bolt, would the 2x6 be overkill, or will the extra strength be a good safety factor? Thanks...
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AgaPSDIVER wrote:

are the uprights gonna be apart to support the whole thing????? remember when you go to a building engineer tell them that you gonna put up a swing for adults on one of the 2 by 6's so they can figure out if this will be strong enough to support it...
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Yes and yes. But, I vote for 2 x 6s. I'd also vote for something other than a thin plywood ceiling. Bead board would be nice. I'd venture you could install bead board with your ceiling joists at 24" oc. Even with 2 x 4s. (But, I'd double up even 2 x 6s at that swing. Some people get carried away on a swing.)
You do know, once you've installed the roof, you no longer have a "patio." By definition, there is no such thing as a "roofed patio."
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AgaPSDIVER wrote:

Definitely go with the 2x6s. I would double the ones that you are planning to hang the swing from. ( Two 2x6s nailed together ) What happens when aunt Ethel ( 280 lbs) and uncle Harry ( 350 lbs) decide they want to sit on the swing when they are visiting? ( Been there, saw that, it was NOT a happy ceiling afterwards. )
--Dale
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as Dale said double the one that might get a swing. Also block the swing rafter in multiple places. Think about few extra dollars it takes for the wood, and then thing what would happen to the cieling if the rafter starts to flex.
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What do national/state/local building codes call for?
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(remove NS to use the address) 614.937.0463 voice 208.975.1011 fax
http://worthingtonengineering.com
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Our ceiling rafters are 2x4 (1954, on a shoestring budget probably, or just what my uncle could get), and every big storm the house sways, creaks, and cracks. Going up in the attic is an adventure - you can't venture away from the center support wall without feeling a noticeable give - I've never gone more than a foot or two out.
2X6 or more.
- Wm

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On Tuesday, December 9, 2003 at 7:09:54 AM UTC-8, William W. Plummer wrote:

I dunno but when I "repaired" (that is the way I drew the permit) my roof o ver the "patio" I could have driven a C60 Chev truck over it if built by wh at the inspector wanted. I did beef up what was there considerably and it was passed by the inspector but only because it was a "repair" permit.
Harry K
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replying to AgaPSDIVER, Sid in Sacramento wrote:

I would use Simpson Strong Tie rafter supports to attach to the house. I would use 2x6 doug fir for my rafters. I would make sure you use at least one inch plus thick exterior grade plywood for your ceiling cover. Make sure the ends away from the house are supported by a 2x12 header, then supported by 4x4 supports , with a concrete footing . You then want to protect from ' shear force' by using 2x6 offset blocking to keep the ratters togeter. If you want to water proof the root material, you might want to buy a five gallon bucket of mobile home sealant, roofing material, and roll it on with a rough roller ? JMHO PS, make sure you slope it, the greater the slope, the lesser the chance that it will leak
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 8:44:08 PM UTC-4, Sid in Sacramento wrote:

LOL
Besides that the post is from 2003, at least 1"+ thick plywood for a porch ceiling? Good grief
>If you want to water proof the root material, you might

LOL Make it vertical and pass that slop bucket mate!
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 5:44:08 PM UTC-7, Sid in Sacramento wrote:

What, no cable tie downs to 4'x4' concrete anchors?
Harry K
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