US: Chinese drywall not harmful

Page 1 of 2  

"[WASHINGTON] Federal product-safety regulators said Thursday that their sampling of Chinese drywall emits higher concentrations of sulfur gases and strontium than U.S.-made product, but found no evidence so far that the emissions were to blame for health problems and metal corrosion reported by at least 1,900 U.S. homeowners."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125682903154416173.html
Who to believe? The government or your own watery eyes?
Let me think...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Both. I'd say it points to a need to get beyond anti Chinese bigotry and look at what else may be in common in the problem houses in question.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One major bit of commonality: the houses were occupied by living, breathing humans.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like cows emit methane, homo sapiens emits hydrogen sulfide, and kitty litter emits ammonia. Has anyone tracked down the emissions of the ubiquitous 'palmetto bugs' that Floridians live with? Endless possibilities...
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Hey Bub- The quote you cited includes the phrase "so far". And if you look at the full Wall Street Journal article in the URL you included in your posting (above), the second paragraph of the full article explicitly identifies the government's report as "preliminary".
In your rush to condemn the government, you are ignoring inconvenient information that negates your criticism.
The alleged structural damage done by the off-gassing from the suspect drywall took time to develop due to the relatively low concentrations of whatever volatile chemicals may be responsible. In order to scientifically establish whether or not the drywall is at fault, it is probably necessary to do a thorough chemical analysis of the off-gasses, including their concentration, and then expose typical home construction materials to the same mixture of gasses at the same concentrations and same conditions of temperature and humidity.
You cannot always extrapolate the effects of low level exposure by using a higher concentration for a shorter exposure period to accelerate the testing time. Many toxic and/or corrosive substances exhibit a threshold effect, where low or very low levels of exposure produce a different (or even null) effect compared with a higher exposure. Doing the science properly takes a certain amount of time that cannot always be rushed, despite what you may believe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yet this is the basis for much of the rat lab testing for cancer status. Feed the rat a couple orders of magnitude more than the human equivalent and wonder why bad things occur.
--
To find that place where the rats don\'t race
and the phones don\'t ring at all.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 10/30/2009 10:04 AM (ET) Kurt Ullman wrote the following:

Even drinking clean water can cause death. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16614865 /
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Isn't that what happened to the saccharin ban that caused cancer in rats ? They fed them enough that a person would have to eat about a gallon of it a day to produce the same results.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph Mowery wrote:

What saccharin ban? All they ever got was a warning on the label which nobody cares about, the stuff is still selling quite well today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The FDA banned it in '72 but was overruled by Congress. BTW: Canada banned it entirely. Probably confusion with cyclamate where the ban stuck.
--
To find that place where the rats don\'t race
and the phones don\'t ring at all.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Retirednoguilt wrote:

You make a good point, yet your point raises an even more interesting question:
If the results (so far) are inconclusive, equivocal, almost meaningless, and merely suggest a hint of a shadow of a possible trend, why say anything at all?
Is the obviously premature report a mistake in its release or an attempt to influence something: Diplomatic relations, pending lawsuit results, the World Series winner?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Because it's interesting, and because there are people who prefer not to buy defective and/or dangerous shit from dictatorships.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Oct 2009 12:31:05 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

At the time people were buying this drywall they just felt lucky to get any drywall from anywhere. It was right after Katrina and in the middle of a building boom that had already swallowed up all the drywall the US could produce.
A few companies like Centex Homes got in front of this problem and built their own drywall plants but most just bought at the market price..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Katrina construction played a major role in the expansion of steel-stud construction (they use sheet metal in C or I sections) which can even be CAD/CAM prefabbed. During WW2 Chinag Kai Shek mothballed his nvy in New Orleans and since they were wooden, they brought over unusually aggressive termites. THose termites have spread so much that south of Mason-Dixon you can't insure new wood-stud construction. CHina has also had a building boom. Ditto the Kemp-Cuomo subprime boom. We have had a lot of innovation, but also there is a lot of room for mistakes when you do things in a hurry. I have friends whose 1970s houses (in one of the five wealthiest zip codes in the country) frighten me: leaking skylights which cook everyone in the summer, plywood floors that keep needing more beams to keep from collapsing; yet these houses continue to fetch astronomical prices. The worst asbestos came about by government mandates and public works booms in the 1930s. Sheetrock was invented largely because of the GI Bill. The financial crisis happened because people introduced too many new things without testing them sufficiently. Edmunde Burke used to advocate making changes slowly because you never know which thread you pull will disintegrate the entire fabric. Such mistakes are inevitable, but I think instead of dropping our guard when we are in a hurry, we should enhance it.
*+-At the time people were buying this drywall they just felt lucky to *+-get any drywall from anywhere. It was right after Katrina and in the *+-middle of a building boom that had already swallowed up all the *+-drywall the US could produce.
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm http://www.facebook.com/vasjpan2 ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you think it's a non-sequitur, you're too busy with other tasks. Come back when you can focus.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Since SW Florida is ground zero in this mess I wonder how much of this sulfur is coming from the drywall and how much is just coming from their well water. That is always a surprise for people who come here from up north.
I know a guy who is fixing two genuine chinese drywall houses as we speak and damage to a running A/C coil seems to be the biggest problem the drywall caused. In the other house the A/C was off and the coil is OK. You are still stripping the walls back to the studs
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

A couple other drywall factoids I got from a friend: Drywall can contain asbestos. If a material contains less than 1% asbestos it is not regulated [1% seems rather high to me]. Some Chinese drywall has been found to have 3% asbestos.
Drywall contains gypsum (it is also called gypsum board). Gypsum is calcium sulfate, so 'normal' drywall contains sulfur (but bound in the gypsum molecule).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This seems to vary from, person to person. I was in a "drywall" house the other day. I noticed the musty smell but it had no real affect on me. My friend had a sore throat, runny nose and he said his eyes burned.
I do have some pictures, this is an FTP site, use your back button to get back to the index.
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/Chinese%20Drywall /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In 1985 NYC air had 1 fiber of asbestos/cc and the Germans workplace standard was .2/cc and the USA one 2/cc. Plus I seem to recall Vermont "white" asbestos is at least one order of magnitude less dangerous than South African "blue" and fiberglass is at least one order of magnituded less hazardous than "white".
*+-Drywall can contain asbestos. If a material contains less than 1% *+-asbestos it is not regulated [1% seems rather high to me]. Some Chinese *+-drywall has been found to have 3% asbestos.
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm http://www.facebook.com/vasjpan2 ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 04:40:59 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com

asbestos costs money. No chinese drywall maker is going to go to the cost of using it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.