Upstairs too hot

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Options:
1. Add insulation in the attic. 12-18 inches above code for your area.
2. Add an attic fan
3. Get a digital, programmable thermostat. Set higher during the day, lower at night.
4. Set your thermostat fan setting at night to ON before going to bed, so it runs even when the temperature has dropped to/below the set point. Set it back to AUTO when you wake. This might also allow you to set the overnight temp 1-2 deg higher and still be comfortable.
5. Keep drapes on south and west sides closed. If you have south/west windows with sheer or no drapes, get opaque drapes.
6. Close off first floor vents in summer so all of the forced air goes upstairs. Open in autumn.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

As is window film, trees, and awnings.
It's probably cheaper to light the room with a couple of CFLs than sunlight when you factor in the A/C costs.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

ya, dampering system and multiple thermostats.
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What are you using for cooling? Separate AC systems for each floor? An evaporative cooler? Only a fan?
What is your climate? Arctic? Tropical? Desert?
Believe it or not, these are factors that are more important than how old your house is.
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First floor. Looked at it, and the hole is about an inch across, but I filled a lot of it with spackle when I changed out to a programmable T-stat a few years ago.

The access panel is really just a square hole in the ceiling with a board over it. The board has a batten (is that the word) of insulation over the top of it.
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On your thermostat, turn the Fan to the ON position. This will circulation all the air in your home and help to eliminate hot and cold spots throughout the house.

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Sounds like you've got air flow problems. Cold air is heavier than warm air, so it's hard for the furnace to push the cold air up from the cellar. You may also have poor air return to the furnace. Many times I've seen under sized air returns causing problems.
As others have mentioned, running the circulating fan all the time may help.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Hi, How is your attic vent and ceiling insulation? Also ceiling fans would help.
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I live in a 100 year old house. Back then they built them to work without AC. I just run an exhaust fan, blowing out, 24/7 in the summer in a hallway window. The kids run fans blowing in when they want to. It cools the house at night and removes the heat buildup during the day. I put a window unit in my bedroom and use it at night for about 2 weeks out of the year.
BTW, I work out of my house so it's not like there's no one home during the day to complain about the heat.
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