Upgrading electrical service

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Eric_Scantlebury wrote:

if you have 14/2 on 20 amp breakers, that might be a reason for the high quotes. those may actually need to be rewired for the electrician to hook them up. if they serve a kitchen he might not be able to replace with a 15A breaker. I can understand why someone might refuse to do that.
Since you say you feel comfortable doing your own wiring, could you repull those with 12/2 prior to the service upgrade? That might make some of your problems go away.
nate
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I'm actually in the process of running those home runs now. I'm also repacing any 15 amp recepticals and switches on those circuits with the 20 amp variety as well. My problem with this is that I'm fairly certain (at least with the one guy I had look at it) the person probably won't accept "my" work. Again, probably because a truck payment is due :-)
So I probably should "code" the existing wiring to the current panel and leave a service "loop" on the current upgraded runs then contact and electrician?
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Eric_Scantlebury wrote:

That's my highly non-professional opinion. FWIW.
nate
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Eric_Scantlebury wrote:

Andy writes: I did a similar thing at a cabin I have. It was built 30 yrs ago and wired for about 70 amps, and I upgraded to 200.
It is in an area where the owner can do anything he/she wants, and no inspection by a building inspector is required.
When the power company is called to change the lines over to the new powerhead, the lineman checks it up thru the input to the panel. After that, he doesn't care, since it is breakered and won't affect the power company....
The panel, pipes, meter box, wire, and misc ran me around $300 -350 total. The power company gave me a diagram of what the dimensions , layout, and clearances had to be for them to hook it up.`..... I used an outdoor panel from Home Depot in a "contractor pack", which had several breakers included. I think it had something like 12 or so slots. It also had a main breaker of 200 amps which was a really good idea for a total disconnect....
It was a good days, work, but actually was kind of fun. I wouldn't reccommend it to anyone who is unfamiliar with power wiring, tho.
Anyway, I built it up like the power company diagram said, with the power head on a 3inch pipe sticking about 4 feet above the roofline, and called the company to make the switchover. The lineman came out, checked it over, plugged in a meter, and changed the pole lines from the 70 amp powerhead to my new 200 amp powerhead, and went away...
Then, at my leisure, I pulled out the old cabin wiring a line at a time, and put in the new romex to my panel. Piece of cake, but dirty, thirsty work.....
Good luck... It ain't rocket surgery, but you need to get familiar with the code and "standard practice".....
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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thanks for the response. Man, I do admire some of you guys doing this stuff - I don't think I could get away with this in Little Rhody though. National Grid, I'm fairly sure, will only deal with a licensed electrician on the "change over" at the meter. I consider myself a fairly high end "DIY"er but I think I have hit my limit with the main and meter cut over.
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A big part of the question is why do you want to upgrade? How old is your current wiring (If it is a 100 amp box it should not be too old)?
Local codes vary greatly. I suggest you will have to ask locally.
When I upgraded my old service (two 30 amp boxes T&K, etc.) I had a friend, professional check out what I had planed first. He agreed with the plan, then I checked with the power company to see what they required and then with the city inspectors. Everything went well with two exceptions: The inspector showed up a day early while I was at work and I had to hurry home and they had required that I hook up the new drop to my wiring with some fancy expensive clamps (live) I did not like working with 240V live, but it went OK. The next day they came along cut my clamps out and put their clamps on. crazy. In any case it all worked with a lot of research before starting.

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Joseph Meehan

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It is strictly because I am out of space to add another fuse (circuit). The fuse panel only accomodates around 12 fuses I believe (I'm not in front of it right now but I believe it's 6 per side. The wiring is fairly new. It's all NM-B wiring - the house was built in the 70's.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2008 07:46:46 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

While fuses are sort of obsolete, they're cheap compared to replacing the whole serv. entrance. You can buy screw in breakers to replace the fuses. They cost around $8 each. If you only need a few more circuits, add a panel with 4 or 6 breaker spaces next to the main panel. Feed it from the main (after the main disconnect). Use wire thick enough to accomodate what you're put in that box.
If you have an unused "Range" disconnect, use that to feed the sub-panel. Just put the sub-panel right next to the main, with a 3/4" pipe nipple and rings. Code requires a plastic protector screwed to the threads (a 50 cent item). It's not that difficult to do.
Of course if you're opening a machine shop in your home, you might actually need 200A. Otherwise 100A is sufficient for most average homes.
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> >> Hello All, >> >> I realize this is a very "open ended" question - but I'm going to ask >> anyway. I'm looking to upgrade my 100amp fuse box to 200 amp breakers >> (and the corresponding service). This is in Rhode Island in the North >> East. If anyone has had this done recently what did you pay for the >> upgrade? Just trying to get an idea of the range of prices that I >> should be looking at. In upgrading am I forced to correct any "out of >> code" stuff? >> >> The reason I ask is I had one guy come in and basically wanted to >> rewire my house. Sorry - that isn't in the cards - for the price I >> was quoted I might as well sell the house and start over. >> >> Also, if anyone has a recomendation for a good electrition in the area >> that chargers a "fair" price I'm all ears. >> >> TIA > > Joseph Meehan wrote:

I will never understand the benefit of requiring the use of Insulating Displacing Taps to energize the new service entry cable on a heavy up. No one has offered a justification for the obvious danger and the outrageous expense of the IDT connectors. The power company installers test the new cable prior to tying in the service conductors to the utility supply wiring anyway so were is the benefit in requiring those high priced taps? -- Tom Horne
"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous for general use." Thomas Alva Edison
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Tom Horne wrote:

They still use those? I thought they came and went. In the area where I worked on a number of service upgrades at first the utility provided the IDT taps, then they stopped using them entirely and said just use bugs.
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Pete C. wrote:

Joseph Bugs are fine if your working on the meter tail and bugging it to the new meter tail because you can pull the meter and work cold. If you're using them to tie in the new service entry conductors above the meter can in for inspection as many inspectors in the North East now insist you must do then you are working hot. To do that in compliance with the standard on electrical worker safety you have to use a complete set of electrical protective clothing that is appropriate to the class IV environment you are working in by bugging the new service entry hot. The inspectors believe that the use of Insulating Displacing Taps removes the need for the protective clothing but Massachusetts Occupational Safety and Health inspectors say no. Two workers required, Full body harness and safety drag line, Class IV environment protective clothing required. Adjacent energized conductors must be guarded, a non conductive ladder must be used and fall protection in place before hot work begins. $10,000 a day for each day in which the violation can be shown to have occurred. UP to $100,000 if serious injury or death results. Also the employers willful violation of the hot work rules voids the limitations on liability provided by the workman's compensation law. -- Tom Horne
"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous for general use." Thomas Alva Edison
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