Updating old house to 200 Amp service?

Anyone done this? What was the approximate procedure and cost? Thanks.
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Assuming it's an overhead service, the procedure is to remove the existing service entrance cable, meter pan, panel, and grounding system and replace all with 200 amp rated equipment. In the Northeast this typically runs from $1500 to $2500

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If you have the following breakers;
50 electric range 40 central a/c 30 water heater 30 dryer 60 subpanel of 120V circuits ------ 210 total
Then what is the appropriate service?
RBM (remove this) wrote:

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The number and size of the breakers does not determine the service required. That is determined by load. What is the actual load assuming that the AC will be running while you are cooking and the dryer is working? I'd opt for 200A but you may get away with 100A real load. You have to read the nameplates.
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Service size is calculated using various methods outlined in article 220 of the NEC. Some of the general load is allowed to reduced by a demand factor. That changes depending on what calculation you use.
There may be an online calculator somewhere....
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Dave wrote:

The size of the service is found by taking the finished square feet of the dwelling and multiplying by three. That gives you the volt-amperes of lighting and convenience receptacle outlets that are not required by another section of the code. You then add 2400 volt-amperes for each kitchen counter circuit, two required; a laundry circuit; each bathroom receptacle circuit, one required; the volt-ampere rating of each appliance fastened in place, the larger of the heating and air conditioning loads and so forth. The resultant volt amperes sum is divided by your service voltage to obtain the size of your service in amperes. There are on line tutorials that will walk you through that process. Breakers are sized to protect the conductors of the circuit through which they are supplied not by the loads those circuits actually carry. The sum of the breaker ratings tells you nothing about the size of your service. -- Tom Horne
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On Fri, 13 Jan 2006 18:57:54 GMT, Thomas Horne

???
You mean 1500 times 2 ? ;-) 220.16 Small Appliance and Laundry Loads Dwelling Unit. (A) Small Appliance Circuit Load. In each dwelling unit, the load shall be computed at 1500 volt-amperes for each 2-wire small-appliance branch circuit required by 210.11(C)(1).
You also have 1500 for the laundry so everyone gets 4500 unless this is a multifamily with a shared laundry.
You can simplify the equasion by saying the 3000 Va @ 100% will be the kitchen, then add 525 for the laundry so you always start at 3525. The rest of the general lighting load is 35% of 3va per foot and you can get a ball park figure by just saying 1va per foot and round up.
Rules of thumb Dryers are 5000va (220.18) Ranges are 8000va (220.19) Water heaters are 4500 or 5500 HVAC has to be based on the largerr of heat or A/C
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And if this adds up to over 100 amps?
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I suppose that is why he wants 200a. ;-)
200 is going to be plenty for most homes, even an all electric.
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200 would be fine
wrote:

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Sure I have do it.
Your really not serious are you, cost and procedure BLIND.
What is the connected/calculated load? How do you know you need a 200 amp service? If your adding up the numbers on the breakers, you need to call a licensed local contractor.
underground or overhead service conductors? all in one panel or meter and panel combo? location of the meter and panel is really important. Location required by utility or jurisdiction? Permits?
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SQLit wrote:

That's what I'm asking.

Minimal household with electric range, dryer, and hot water, but I want excess capacity for two workshop sub-panels and welder outlets.

Adding two sub-panels makes it likely?

I can do grade-school math.

Overhead.
Meter is outside. Panel is on basement wall.

I doubt the panel location would have to move.

Unknown.
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Yep I opened a phone book, looked under "E" and found the word "electrcians". I called the one with the biggest ad. The guy came while I was at work and did the job. When I got home all my lights worked so I guess he changed it. The cost was 27.8 billion dollars. I'm pleased. You can do the same.
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