Update update

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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Have you found the most recent versions of FF to load slow and be bloated ? I moved over to Opera recently because FF was getting to be slooooooooow and a general PITA with continuous "improvements" that added nothing to my user experience . Loaded v43.0.1 on a laptop (the subject of this and my other recent posts) and several websites said it was "out of date" and refused to function . Opera ain't perfect , but it does do what I need ...
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On 05/14/2016 01:52 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

I only go on-line using my Linux machine and indeed found FF problematic until I dumped most of the add-ons etc, Now it seems to work very well.
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wrote:

Running 46.01 on Windows 10 - no issues - but I remove virtually all add-ins that I don't absolutely need from any browser (and any program, as far as that goes)
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On 5/14/2016 11:52 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

This is true of most software. "Software grows to consume the CPU cycles (and memory!) available to it!" It is especially true of larger pieces of code AND projects with multiple, loosely-coupled developers -- no one has "the big picture" in mind. The approach is more like an ant colony: each ant HOPING that his efforts contribute to the Whole but being largely clueless about how he (and his efforts) fits into that Whole.

Depends on what you want *of* a browser. The more you expect it to do FOR you, the more bloated (and brittle) it will be.
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On Thursday, May 12, 2016 at 11:00:39 PM UTC-4, philo wrote:

I looked at the demos for Win 10. From what I can see it's different enough from Win 7 to be annoying, but not so different that you can't get it to be close to Win 7 and learn how to use it. A friend said that was his experience, he had to spend time changing some things around, etc.
On the other hand, I see no new features, benefits to me. The only neat thing I saw was that you can mark up a webpage and then send it to someone. For example, you could circle a couple of things on a page. On the other hand, I don't have the need to do that. And even worse, that only works with a touchscreen device.
So, for me the only real advantage would be to be able to move to Win 10 for free and be on a new product that has a longer support life than the Win 7, which is now 3 1/2 more years. I'll probably move before the free upgrade runs out soon. But I also wouldn't be surprised if they extend that.
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On 05/13/2016 10:31 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I decided to take one of my many "stand by" machines and update it to Win10.
It all went OK. probably won't use the machine unless I have some kind of a minor emergency...but if it's a few years from now, at least I'll have a newer OS on hand.
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wrote:

With the "custom install" option you can shut off virtually all the "privacy issue" concerns.
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On 05/13/2016 12:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, the first time I did a Win10 install, I just went with the express setup.
Next time I took the "custom" option and even for Microsoft was shocked by all the spying they enable by default. I suggest no one use that option...though the spying can be turned off later.
If you do not have the "Home" version of Win10, " policy editor" allows manual control of updates and reboots.
Google will give the exact instructions.
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wrote:

Cool, I am glad top see they are still there. You had me ready to load a machine to try it. (I always have something around here that could use a brain transplant) When I load one and put SP3 on, the updates come overnight.
Just for gee whiz info, their authentication server seems to be turned off. I have loaded 2 machines the same day with the same key and both of them got updated. When I went for MovieMaker, they passed the "genuine" test.
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On 5/12/2016 6:55 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

The wsoffline tools should have had all of the "required" updates. Did it NOT install all of them?
Also, you should review each update as MS's idea of "security"/required may differ from yours!
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Don Y wrote:

The updates are there but I found no way to install them except one at a time . Tht gets old after the first 15 or 20 ...
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On 5/13/2016 5:09 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

There are two programs involved.
UpdateGenerator.exe gives you a dialog that lets you decide which updates you want to download (fetch) from Microsoft. You "tick" boxes for all of the updates that you want and it chugs along for ages getting all of the files.
Once you have the updates on a "local disk", you run UpdateInstaller.exe. This lets you decide which updates you want to *install*. Again, you "tick" boxes in a dialog for things like: - C++ runtime libraries - Security Essentials - Remote Desktop client - .NET frameworks etc.
There are two boxes in this dialog that you "always" want to tick: - verify the updates (ensures the files that you PREVIOUSLY downloaded are intact and genuine/signed) - show log file
Once you begin, it sorts out which updates you NEED to install based on your "ticked" choices. Then, it figures out what prerequisites each of those require (it does this by examining a file that it downloaded previously that declares these prerequisites). It usually takes a long time (several minutes, depending on CPU speed) to sort through this "prerequisite list".
[The prerequisite list says things like: install update KB345039 before KB998744, install update KB747463 if .NET4 is present, etc.]
Then, it chugs through the hundred plus updates applying them in the "correct" order -- and only those that SHOULD be applied.
While this is happening, you see a DOS box (text screen) that just rattles off all of the files that it is installing: "Installing update 1 of 115 Verifying integrity of \blah\blah\update1's_real_name Installing \blah\blah\update1's_real_name ... Installing update 47 of 115 Verifying integrity of \blah\blah\update47's_real_name Installing \blah\blah\update47's_real_name Installing update 48 of 115 Verifying integrity of \blah\blah\update48's_real_name Installing \blah\blah\update48's_real_name ..."
When this is done, it will either say, "Done" or "Please reboot and ReRun". The latter happens when the update process requires a reboot before it can continue.
In either case, when you reboot, you end up seeing a (notepad?) window that displays a log of all of the actions that it did. You can save this so you can have a record of its actions -- which updates it installed, etc. You can run the UpdateInstaller.exe again to select other updates and this log file just grows.
So, if you are only interested in updating XP, ... and, given that XP no longer has any NEW updates, ... once you have downloaded all of the updates with UpdateGenerator.exe, you NEVER need to talk to MS again!
Build a new machine? Install XP using your XP CD (with sp3, preferably). Then, run UpdateInstaller.exe with the files you downloaded.
I.e., your machine has NEVER talked to MS and you have all of the updates in place.
Repeat for the next machine...
Said another way, before your machine is ever exposed to the ugly/nasty Internet, you can have all of the security updates in place!
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