update on impact wrench

I wrote a post a few weeks ago, about getting a cordless impact wrench for my vehicles, as a back injury overseas, has made things difficult for me. I wound up with the dewalt 12v, 1/2 inch unit. I have had very positive results. The formerly useless rusted on lugs are finally free. I heavily sprayed once again some wrench brand penetrating fluid. I waited about ten minutes, and banged each lug a few times, and repeated the lubrication liquid again. I waited another five minutes and tried to free with a cross bar wrench, with a long section of pipe for leverage. No dice. I put a regular sized 21mm impact socket on the impact wrench and applie the trigger at first slowly. Nothing going on. I pressed the trigger down all the way, and applied a bit of forward pressure, and after about four or five seconds the lug zipped all the way out. Okay I said, lets see what happens. All the other lugs came out the same, with the exception of one lug. I changed to a deep socket and that did the trick. I cleaned off all the exposed metal, and using the wrench, gave a light tightening for a half second, and tighented to specs using a manual torque wrench. I am glad I got the wrench. I went to rotate the tires on my xterra(which I could do with a regular lug wrench), but using the impact, saved me a lot of wear and tear and time on my back, and was a joy to use. Net effect, I made a good decision and the tool, proved to get the job done. I leave the wrench in the trunk of the car, and will change the battery out every month.
Much regards
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I don't think I realized there were already lugs this was needed for. I thought you were just planning for some occasion in the future.
I'm glad you're happy with what you got. I know that feeling and it's a good one.
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With a 12V unit,I wonder if you could get or make an adapter to use the car battery for power? (use a heavy 2 wire zip cord;14 or 12 ga.)
then you don't have to worry about charged battery packs.
BTW,hot environments discharge battery packs faster than normal. Like the inside of a car on a sunny day easily gets to 140 degF.,NOT good for your battery packs.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

Not that it matters this time of year, but really cold environments aren't good for battery storage (or use) as concerns most battery types.
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Which do you think is worse?? (WRT storage)
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Jim Yanik wrote:

I think cold beyond a certain temperature (which is cell-type dependent) makes the battery more feeble than heat while it's being used. I have the curves somewhere for a few battery types but not at my fingertips. For storage without use I don't think there's a big difference, but hot would take a little more out of it.
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Cold will slow the chemical reaction and cause moisture to condense on the cells,but high heat increases the chem reaction,meaning faster self- discharge(the cells get deeper-discharged faster),AND the high heat will affect the cell seals. Plastics degrade in high heat.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

That's why I found it pretty amazing to see how battery output declines so rapidly below certain cell-dependent temperatures. I could have pictured lots of degradation at temperatures where the electrolyte congeals or freezes, but that doesn't seem to have anything to do with what the curves show.
If you're thinking about battery life and physical condition rather than electrical capacity, then I would suppose heat is worse (unless we talk about extreme temperatures where things get strange).
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wrote:

Well,WRT heat inside an auto,my main worry would be the NiCd/NiMH battery discharging and not being useable when I needed it. Lithiums have a wider temp tolerance,and far lower self-discharge,I've read.(at a higher cost)
Also,since any rechargable cell has some average of charge/discharge cycles for it's lifetime,the more often you have to recharge the battery,the shorter it's lifetime,and the sooner it's capacity dwindles.
that's why I suggested an adapter,to enable using the impact driver with the car's 12V lead-acid battery,always ready.(and hi-capacity,too!) No need to worry if the driver is charged,or have it die right when you need it most. Sure,then you have a "corded" driver,but what's the big deal? you can keep your NiCd/NiMH packs home in reasonable temps.
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When it is cold, does using the battery warm it up and restore the voltage etc?
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mm wrote:

To an extent, and it would depend on current (and thus also wattage) being used from the battery. I'm mentally picturing NiCd batteries in a not-high-current use and thinking an armpit is more appropriate. I have had people tell me they get good results on cold days with car batteries by turning on the headlights for 30 seconds before starting the car; haven't really had to try it myself.
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...

...
...
As a note -- as you observed, loosening a tight/corroeded fastener w/ an impact wrench there's nothing to be gained by going gentle -- it's the torque and impact together that make the tool effective so minimizing either essentially is the same as nothing. I suspect the socket deep/standard had nothing to do w/ the result but instead a case of "first time got it ready for the second". It is important to make sure you have impact-rated sockets, however (I note you mention that at least once, but just for emphasis)...
Nice to know it was strong enough...
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Have any of you seen the Milwaukee clip on the race car? The little foreign car comes in for a tire change. They take one tire off, and put a new one on. They spin the lug nut with the Milwaukee ..... WHAM! ........ the car entirely flips backwards and lands on its roof. Surely computer generated, but looks real as hell. I have it in my archives, but don't know if it's still up anywhere on the net. The guy I got it from got it from an Italian site. If you want it, I could forward it.
Steve
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