Unused water heater, leave full or empty?

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On 2/5/2013 5:19 PM, chaniarts wrote:

There are actually mixing valves to mix hot water from the water heater with the water supply to the toilet to keep the toilet tank from sweating. ^_^
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wrote:

Sounds like bidet temperature.... lol
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On 2/5/2013 8:36 PM, Existential Angst wrote:

You mean one of those French made pet water fountains in a bathroom. ^_^
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wrote:

Also a hillbilly water fountain/emergency eyewash.... A few here.... George, Attila, JoeBoi -- will proly further misconstrue it, and use it to pressurize demselves, shooting off the bidet like a water rocket.... proly up to the stratosphere.
--
EA


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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Shouldn't you use ice water for those?
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On 2/6/2013 6:00 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I suppose it depends on whether or not your dog likes ice water? O_o
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

You've never seen a dog go berserk over ice cubes? Or give you a dirty look, because all the ice has melted & the water in their bowl is warm?
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On 2/6/2013 7:29 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

The Rotthuahua that adopted me doesn't like the cold. Actually her name is Sandy, a Red Chihuahua who thinks she's a Rottweiler and her little mouth is so tiny, a normal sized ice cube is too big for her anyway. Heck, the body temperature of those barking rats is normally 101F and it's surprisingly cold at floor level which is why Sandy is always finding something to burrow under like a coat, towel or blanket to stay warm. ^_^
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On Wed, 06 Feb 2013 08:00:26 -0600, The Daring Dufas

All dogs have a body temperature of 101-102F, no? Rat-dogs just have a lot more surface area (per weight) than large dogs.
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On 2/6/2013 11:53 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The goofy little dog burrows under the blankets with me and is like a four legged hot water bottle and sometimes the little critter will lick my knee and of course it tickles but it feels like a big Q-tip dipped in hot water. An Internet search shows a normal body temp of up to 102.5F for the mini-mutts. ^_^
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'The Daring Dufas[_8_ Wrote: > ;The goofy little dog burrows under the blankets with me and is like a

> in

This is trivia, but the 1970's rock band named "Three Dog Night" got it's name from the Inuit practice of sleeping with their sled dogs in the snow shelters they would make for themselves every night. That's because dogs have a higher metabolic rate than people so their body temperature is higher, and sleeping with dogs is like sleeping with hot water bottles. A three dog night would, according to Inuit hunters, be a very cold night.
PS: The term "Inuit" refers to the indigenous peoples of northern Alaska, nothern Canada and Greenland, and means "people" in the native language of the Inuit. If any of the Americans in here ever get up to Alaska, northern Canada or Greenland, keep in mind that the Inuit consider the word "eskimo" to be a derogatory slur (but not nearly as derogatory or insulting as the "N" word is to African Americans). That's cuz the word "eskimo" is what the early Europeans settlers referred to these people as, and in the Inuit language the word "eskimo" roughly translates to "eater of raw meat". The Inuit have long felt that was an insulting label.
The government of Canada trains some Inuit people to be it's eyes and ears in the North. These people make regular patrols in the remotest regions of our northern islands and are trained to identify foreign (notably Soviet and Danish) military activity in Northern Canada and report that activity back to the Canadian government. This reconnaisance is especially important in the area between Baffin Island and Greenland where the ownership of Hans Island (and therefore the ownership of the associated mineral resources and fishing rights) is in dispute. This group of Inuit are officially part of the Canadian military and are known as the "Canadian Rangers". The role of the Canadian Rangers will increase in importance as global warming opens up a year-round ice-free sea route between Europe and the far East.
'Canadian Rangers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Rangers)
--
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On Thu, 7 Feb 2013 08:27:35 +0000, nestork

c/Inuit/Aborigines/ c/dog/Dingo
What do they think of being called Aborigines?

What does Canuckistan do with Aborigines?

Since you're using Wiki...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Dog_Night#Band_name_origin
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On 2/7/2013 2:27 AM, nestork wrote:

I thought the "Three do night" reference involved a practice of the Australian Aborigines? That's what I remember anyway. ^_^
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On 2/7/2013 12:30 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

I just noticed I missed the "G" in dog. "do", I could have been referring to three hairdos. ^_^
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On Thu, 07 Feb 2013 12:30:39 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Yep.
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

The Shitzu by dad & step mom had would sit out in the yard, and lay on snow when it was below freezing. Maggie loved to have her bowl full of ice water & cubes to chew on. :)
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Tried that with my dog Picked out the ice cubes and dropped them next to the bowl and ignored them while they melted and made a puddle.
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Attila Iskander wrote:

Some dogs are weird. Of course, living in Florida where their water can hit 120 degrees out in the sun may make a difference.
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PrecisionmachinisT wrote:

I am not sure, but I think that technically speaking that approach won't save any money on energy costs. The reason is that for the water in the first tank to be brought up to room temperature, it needs to draw its heat energy from the room. So, it will cost that much more to heat the room because some of the room heat is going toward heating the water in the first tank. In other words, there is no free heat -- it either gets its heat from being heated by at working hot water tank, or it gets its heat from the room and that heat energy needs to be replaced by the heating system for the room.
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On Monday, February 4, 2013 2:56:03 PM UTC-5, TomR wrote:
00yqz.googlegroups.com... >>> A friend has a house that came with two identical water >>> heaters hooked up in parallel. He doesn't need all the capacity, >>> so we turned one of them off and turned off the water going >>> into it. This was several years ago. The water heater was >>> about 4 years old at the time, it's now 7 years old. >>> >>> Given that a tank has already had some service, what would >>> you guys do to try to keep the spare tank available for as long >>> as possible? >>> >>> Leave it full of water? >>> >>> Drain it? >>> >>> My thought was that draining it would be worse, because >>> allowing air in, it would rust....... >>> >>> >> >> Fill it with water, add a rust inhibitor? >> >> As an aside, shouldn't two water heaters be hooked up in series? >> Been meaning to post that to the group. The rcm peeple should have >> some insights into both Qs. > Having a second tank that's unpowered, uninsulated, and plumbed in > series so that cold water passes through it first will reduce > summertime AC and water heating costs by naturally warming the inlet > water up to room temp. I am not sure, but I think that technically speaking that approach won't save any money on energy costs. The reason is that for the water in the first tank to be brought up to room temperature, it needs to draw its heat energy from the room. So, it will cost that much more to heat the room because some of the room heat is going toward heating the water in the first tank. In other words, there is no free heat -- it either gets its heat from being heated by at working hot water tank, or it gets its heat from the room and that heat energy needs to be replaced by the heating system for the room.
I believe he said "reduce summer time costs". And it does do that since ground water and city water are usually a lot cooler than summer air temps.
I run two wh in series with the 1st one on a 30amp switch in the hall. When I anticipate guests or otherwise needing extra hw I just turn it on.
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