Unsafe Patio Roof

I am negotiating to buy a home that has a patio enclosure. But its roof is just an aluminum "standing-seam pan" cover, without any supports except the wall posts. Very bogus.
The enclosure is 18 ft x 15 ft, and the aluminum pans are thin (maybe .035), and when I apply about 100 pounds to a 'rib', it deflects downward more than one inch. (and twists)
This is obviously an illegal and unsafe flat roof. The snow/ice loading used for Ohio is 30-40 pounds/sqft. And a person clearing a snow drift adds a concentrated and moving load.
The owner says the roofs passed city inspection, so all is fine. I don't want to pay for a structural engineer, so I need proof that the roof must have joists, and purlins or decking. (proof that any kid can understand)
Does the International Residential Code spell this out in a clear way ? I have found examples and specs, but I need to convince fools.
-- Any solid info appreciated.
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How long has the roof been there? Seems like it is your opinion and not fact. Makes me wonder just who the fool is.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

> Seems like it is your opinion and not

I passed the EIT, and have 25 years in mech design. And a pile of documentation showing that the maximum span for steel pans is 5 feet. (not 15 ft for aluminum)
Now, answer your own question.
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So, if you have that big pile of documentation, why do you have to ask for help? Steel pans and aluminum roofs are different? I'd still like to know how long it has been standing.
Why not ask the building inspector about code. He passed it so he should know.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

That's where I'd go, with as much info, pics as possible and see what the building inspector says. You may find there is no record of building permit or inspection.
What exactly does the seller mean that it passed city inspection? This could mean anything from a building permit was taken out and inspected during construction to they called the city over for a CO inspection recently during the sales process. Those two are very different. A CO inspection is usually just a cursory, quick walk through to make sure there are smoke detectors, no obvious missing railings on stairs, etc. They don't typically look at roof structures for a CO.
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What is your problem, you don't like nor trust the unsupported roof, neither would I. Adjust your price offer to cover a replacement if you want or buy it and tear it off when you own it. Either you want the house or you don't, to get the price down because of the roof is your opinion against the owner's opinion and whether he will sell for less. He may feel others won't care about the roof and not lower his price.

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EXT wrote:

I think his point is if he has supporting evidence that the roof is unsafe, eg the building inspector says so, then the seller is a lot more likely to realize he needs to account for it in the price. Just because a prospective buyers says it's unsafe doesn't mean much.

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