Unpainted exterior stucco (after roof replacement)

I had my roof replaced last November. There was around 40 feet of stucco they removed and replaced (height of 8 inches) in order to install the flashing where the roof met stuccoed vertical walls on the second story. Some companies do a double layer of stucco, but my contractor did one.
The contractor told me I should prime the new stucco after a month or two. I did some research and evidently you use a special primer for stucco. But people said you should paint after priming. So far, I've done neither. Rains will start in a few weeks, maybe a month, maybe longer I'm not ready to paint the whole house exterior (two story, 1925 square foot). Should I just prime and paint the unpainted stucco anyway (use some innocuous color topcoat, water based) in the mean time? Thanks for guidance.
Dan
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

I would say you have already waited too long.
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Joseph Meehan

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On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 19:01:09 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"
:Dan_Musicant wrote: :> I had my roof replaced last November. There was around 40 feet of :> stucco they removed and replaced (height of 8 inches) in order to :> install the flashing where the roof met stuccoed vertical walls on :> the second story. Some companies do a double layer of stucco, but my :> contractor did one. :> :> The contractor told me I should prime the new stucco after a month or :> two. I did some research and evidently you use a special primer for :> stucco. But people said you should paint after priming. So far, I've :> done neither. Rains will start in a few weeks, maybe a month, maybe :> longer I'm not ready to paint the whole house exterior (two story, :> 1925 square foot). Should I just prime and paint the unpainted stucco :> anyway (use some innocuous color topcoat, water based) in the mean :> time? Thanks for guidance. :> :> Dan : : I would say you have already waited too long. How so? What should I do now?
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

Well as noted some stucco should not be painted, but if the paint was for protection of the stucco then it should have been done some time ago. I would have suggested it being done some time ago even if it was for looks only as now you have stucco that likely should be cleaned before painting.
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Joseph Meehan

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Dan_Musicant wrote:

It strikes me that the prime coat has to do with paint, not stucco. I would check with stucco manufacturers. They want their product to work and have tech staff to deal with questions like this. TB
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Real stucco does not need paint and should not be painted. If your house is unpainted real stucco a coat of new stucco is best.
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On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 19:26:59 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:
:Real stucco does not need paint and should not be painted. If your house :is unpainted real stucco a coat of new stucco is best. The pre-existing stucco was painted. Should I prime and paint the stucco patch work they did? They tore out 40' x 8" of stucco and put in new stucco, all to make way for the flashing.
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

Why people paint stucco I just don't get. It can't breathe too well with paint all over it :)
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your fine dont worry...i mean we're not supposed to paint stucco because it makes maintence free turn into maintenance but i doubt you'd find a new or old house in florida or texas that is not painted. So its messed up from the start. And they also say you're not supposed to paint or seal stucco because it breaths but we paint over it anyways. I'm in florida it rains like hell and sun is like hell and mildew,etc build like hell...i chose to seal a section of new stucco i had because moisture like ours generally doesnt go well with bonding.
You're supposed to wait for the stucco to cure, depending on who you ask some will say 2 months some will say up to a year...same with concrete! This also gives it time to for efflorence to release which would make your paint want to peel. I've found with concrete products the longer the wait to cure the better.
if you dont want to paint now just put some clear masonry sealer , thats the special primer, alkyld reistant, koolseal or the like on it. then prime and paint when you're ready.
** Now my stucco is over block might be different for stucco over lath,wood,etc. **
thats what i did i a similiar situation, i waited 6+ months for it to cure, then i sealed it until i got around to painting later in the year...that way i could hose brush it down instead or pressurewashing,etc. its been 5 years so far.
thats my story..for what its worth
Dan_Musicant wrote:

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Also the stucco breathing is when you have a colored dash coat...you most definently would'nt want to seal that. That stucco needs to breath. Dry stucco & moisture cause effloresence naturally if its dash color coat this will not be a problem. This is chalky white and with painted stucco efflorencse can cause peeling. If you wait for it to cure efflorence should be less an issue. To be sure you can seal it.
disclaimer: if my memory of when i did my house years ago on this topic is correct this is what i seem to remember.
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