unmounting old bathroom sink

I bought a new sink to go in my '29 bathroom.
Now, to get rid of the old wall mount caste iron one. I don't see how it is mounted.
What I think is that it may be on some kind of a clip (near the top) and it would have to be lifted. Unfortunately there is some wall molding that runs right on top the top edge of the sink and that would have to be removed, if that is the case. Perhaps why it has stayed put 81 years.
Anyone know how they used to mount sinks?
Jeff
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Your idea of a wall-mounted clip holding the sink on is probably correct. Unless you want to sell the sink to a salvage yard, after protecting the floor with a heavy carpet scrap, I would apply a 5 to 10 lb sledgehammer to the sink in an upward direction. Have someone help to hold the sink from totally crashing down onto the floor. The object should be to break the sink into small enough pieces that they can be easily removed to the trash. If you strike in a downward direction, depending on what gives first, you might rip the sink and the supporting bracket right out of the wall and damage the supporting studs in the process.
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On 10/3/2010 11:40 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Sounds like a plan. The cast iron equivalent of a sawzall!
Jeff

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Sounds stupid to me. Probably on an old tim the toolman episode somewhere as well. Figure out how it is mounted and remove it correctly.
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On 10/4/2010 8:57 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

Cast iron is brittle and breaks, one way to remove old drain pipe.
I'm not thrilled about breaking it, but I don't want to break my bathroom either by cutting out the waist molding (that is painted and finished in the style of the bathroom) that sits right on top and was no doubt added after.
Sometimes a creative solution is called for.
Jeff
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You are assuming that the sink will break before anything else. You could just as easily end up pulling a chunk of wall off along with the sink. But hey it's liable to be entertaining so go ahead. Please post some pictures afterwards.
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You could also video-tape it and maybe get on Americas Funniest Home Videos if something goes wrong<G>.
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That is without a doubt the dumbest ass thing I have ever read on a NG...
In order to properly deconstruct something with the minimal amount of damage you have to uninstall things in the reverse order of the way they were installed...
So if the molding looks like it had to have been installed AFTER the sink, it must be removed before you can have any chance of removing the sink without damaging anything else...
Here is the problem -- if you don't feel qualified to carefully remove a wall moulding, how on earth are you going to remove a sink without doing some damage to something, especially if you resort to hammers to break it apart, then go about installing a NEW sink -- just remove the stupid moulding, or find a plumber who will do it for you... This job sounds out of your league if you are posting replies like this...
~~ Evan
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Jeff Thies wrote the following:

And is probably covering the sink mounting device?

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Smitty Two wrote:

Honestly, the answers some people come up with. Is that supposed to be a joke?
OP, the right way to do this job is to get a length of rope or cable, and securely tie it around the sink. Run the other end of the rope or cable out of the window. If there is no window, you can drill a small hole in the wall, taking care to catch any drywall dust so as not to create a mess (you can easily patch the small hole with some spackle when you are finished).
Now, back your car near the wall, and tie the rope or cable to your bumper or trailer hitch, leaving about 20 feet of slack in the line.
Press the accelerator in the vehicle until the engine RPM is 3000 to 4000, quickly release the clutch, and let the tool do the work for you. When you are finished, sthe rope/cable will cleanly remove the sink and the attachment mechanism from the wall.
Jon
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Jeff Thies wrote:

I replaced a green wall mounted sink in my 1955 vintage bathroom with a modern wall mounted white sink.
The mounting bracket was heavy cast iron on the underside of the sink at the top, and it was visible from under the sink. I used penetrating lubricant on the bolts, starting a few days before I attempted to remove the bolts. Don't forget to remove any caulk that seals the sink to the wall.
The bolts were stiff, but the sink came off the wall much easier than I expected.
The hard part was getting a sturdy mount for the new sink with the flimsy new bracket.
I recommend against the sledge hammer method. If the wall around the sink is tiled, that would be an excellent way to crack the wall tile.
I have many photos of the replacement process, if you like I will email a few to you that may be helpful.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I'm filtering all Google Groups posters.
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Tony Sivori wrote:

The few sinks I have removed also were hung on a bar on the wall. The sink had tabs that dropped in behind the bar. As Bob suggests, look up under the sink and see what you can see. If you can't lift the sink (the way these sinks were removed) you could remove the bar. IMHO that is the safe way to remove the sink in your case (if you don't want to remove the molding). If you can't remove the bar fasteners you could try sawzalling behind the bar. If not careful, this can also damage the wall molding. More important, you will be removing the support for a heavy sink which can drop on you.

I also think a sledge hammer will damage the wall. And I think you would wind up with part of the sink still mounted on the wall bracket, which you would have to remove.

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