Unlock your car with a string

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On 11/2/2011 14:10, Ron wrote:

In the 70s and 80s GM cars used one key for the ignition and another for everything else. They claimed production efficiency by shipping the steering column assemblies complete with keys to the plant where the rest of the car was assembled.
Otherwise the rationale was that you left only the ignition/door key with a valet and your trunk and glove compartment were "safe."
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On 11/2/2011 9:02 PM, Bob wrote:

a square key for ignition, and round for the rest. But if car was ordered as a fleet special, the square key worked everything.
--
aem sends...

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wrote:

key made that will open the car but NOT allow you to drive it. Keep one of those "cheapies" in your wallet, or hidden elsewhere, in case you lock you "chip key" in the car. Doesn't help much if you LOOSE that "chip key" though, like dropping it down a storm drain, or off the dock - - - - .
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On Wed, 2 Nov 2011 07:11:54 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

dozen company trucks (which could not open his) and quite a few other GM vehicles in the lot. Must have been equivalent to a "master key".
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On 11/2/2011 8:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Dirty little secret for many years- there simply were not that many different keys in use. There were 2 generations of pre-chip square-head Ford double-sided keys, short, then long. Within each generation, if you had a couple dozen keys, odds are one would be close enough to work. Had a couple instances of that with Fords I had, and friend's family's Ford products. Pre-chip, GM had 8 or 9 different groove patterns on their blanks, ID'd by a letter on the blank. Each year would start with the next letter. Dunno about Chrysler. AMC probably went with whoever's steering columns they used that year.
Most junkyards kept a bucket of pulled keys, so kids would not walk off with them. DAMHIKT. Not sure where my collection went.
--
aem sends...

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On 11/2/2011 9:11 AM, Harry K wrote:

I have a key loop on my belt with extra vehicle keys on it on different rings. when I'm working and get distracted to the point I lock my keys in the van, I reach for my belt and unlock the van without skipping a beat. I told my goofy roommate to put a house key on a string around his neck because he's always losing it. I very rarely lose a key. ^_^
TDD
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Lock picks are as useless as a precision engraver to most people. Lock picks are definitely not as easy to master even the basics of as most people think. My first lock took me ten minutes, and it was a Kwikset, about the easiest to open there is. A lock that a locksmith could get into in thirty seconds might take an amateur an hour. And said amateur COULD foul up something, increasing the cost of repair. Get a magnetic Hide a Key, or wallet key. AND, in some states, merely being in possession of lock picks without having a state issued locksmith ID is grounds for possession of burglary tools, no matter what your explanation is. Steve
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My mechanic's licence would gat me off the hook for carrying a slim-jim in my van.
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And whether or not you're dealing with Deputy Fife, or a reasonable person. We have letters of authorization from the developer and property management companies, and that is just gain entry "by any means possible" to equipment areas, pool gates, storage, but NO domiciles. It is amazing the number of times we are dispatched to investigate a property, and are given no gate codes or keys ..............
I also consult, and give a security evaluation, checking how easy their systems are to defeat. Some can be defeated with a short twig of wood laying on the ground.
We also have a SIL who is a sergeant, and daughter who is a regular officer in that jurisdiction.
I have never opened a car for a resident, though, as I do not want to open that bag of snakes. Even if I SEE the person lock their own cars. To do it right, you need to see their driver's license, compare that to registration papers in the glove box, and if they don't match, guess what you're SUPPOSED to do?
DEPUTY FIFE, ASAP! Don't make a lot of sense, but it's the way I do it. But then, at times, I don't make a lot of sense, as you know.
Steve
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On 11/5/2011 12:17 PM, Steve B wrote:

Unless caught during a B&E or with a trunk full of swag, how often is anyone actually charged with 'possession of burglars tools'? As a kid, when I actually made money using tools, the back of the station wagon often included multiple crowbars, bigass screwdrivers, duct tape, and giant bolt cutters. And being a kid with out-of-county plates, I got rousted by cops on a regular basis. None of them ever even blinked at the contents of the vehicle. I think maybe one of them asked 'ya work construction, huh?'. Of course, I am as pale-skinned and red-haired as my Viking ancestors, so I may not be a representative data point. (DWB existed even back then.)
--
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wrote:

Very clever.

If one is going to break in with a slim jim, and probably by breaking the window, it's better to do so on the passenger side. A friend locked his keys in the car in Cambridge Md. and the cops there are nice enough there to break in with a slim jim. But in doing so he unhooked the rod inside the driver's door, and my friend had to go in through the passenger side all day. He had passengers during the day, so we broke even, but when he went home, until he fixed it, it woudl have been better if the pasenger door lock didn't work and his door did.
(I fixed the lock before he left. )
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Actually, the rear doors are the easiest way to get in, particularly if the buttons can be seen. Bend a piece of stout wire in two L's, making a boxy looking J. Put a couple of shims between glass and gasket. Make one L about 3" long, the other 2". You're trying to go under the bottom part of the window and come up under the button with the tip of the wire. You can also do it with a slim Jim, just feel around in there, and when you see the door button move, you've hit a component.
Be very careful when pulling or pushing, as a lot of the pieces are held together with just a plastic keeper. Lincolns take about two seconds with this wire. Stainless steel filler wire is the best, as it doesn't bend easily, and will stay stiff when you hit the right component. Slim jims should have different ends, one with a J, the other with a V. That way, whether you have to push or pull, you have the right configuration.
Sometimes the slim Jim has to be repeatedly curved so it gets over to the mechanism. It ain't very hard once you've done a couple of hundred of them. On the front door, you keep your finger on the outside of the lock so you can feel when you touch the component inside. After that, it's just mentally visualizing what's in there, and bending the slim Jim to catch what you need. Trips to the local junk yard are a good thing, too, if you're going to seriously get into this, as you can see the mechanisms exposed. It is surprising how very simple some of them actually are.
Steve
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wrote:

$92 per year, when you could get a spare key made for $1.92 to put in your wallet and it will last the lifetime of your car....... Some people just dont get it!!!!
Of course if they help with other things such as flat tire, towing, etc. then it's not a bad deal....
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wrote:

I did mention NASCAR :) Were you not paying attention?
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Yeah, and the infield part just makes matters worse....especially the infield at Dega.
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In most cases the windshield is going to be more expensive than a door glass or quarter glass. A big back glass is usually the most expensive piece of glass to replace. Just depends on what kind of car it is and how old it is. The markup on windshields by most companies (especially Safelite that makes most of their own windshields) is around 200%!
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wrote:

And the vent window is even smaller. Sometimes you can force them open.
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I don't believe a Camaro has had a true, operable vent window since 1967.
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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No Comnent.
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On Fri, 4 Nov 2011 18:49:59 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Grasping for straws? Changing direction? Your post concerns whether a cell phone can be used to operate a remote unlock receiver on a car. I will stay on topic.

In the context of your original statement: " by going through a cell phone (that transmits sound waves, not RF)." The following is true:
The cell phone transmits by using RF, not sound. Otherwise we could make long distance calls by just carrying large audio amps around. In order for any distance to be achieved the sound has to piggyback a ride on a RF signal. Then the RF form is transmitted. Upon arrival the sound is extracted from the RF form.
Mythbusters failed when it came to debunking the cell phone trick. If they would of thought out of the box they would never have claimed that a cell phone could not unlock a car.
I'm not going to go into any great detail here but this trick can happen because of these factors.
A.The remote induces a RF signal into the cell phone circuitry bypassing the normal microphone element. (think out of the box)
B.The unwanted remote RF with modulation can mix with the normal signal in the phone. Thus being transmitted.
C.Even though the radio frequency from the phone is different than that from the remote the harmonics from the phone can have enough signal strength and intelligence to activate the receiver on the car.
Mythbusters is a great show but they only used one configuration of cell phones and one configuration of a remote. The ability of this trick depends on many variables to do with the phones and the remote. Mythbusters used no variables. They failed at myth busting.
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