Ungrounded GFCI with ground jumpered to neutral


When installing GFCI outlets on ungrounded circuits today, the electrician fitted each with a jumper between ground and neutral. I told him I'd thought I'd read that this was a bad thing but he insisted that it was the correct way to wire an ungrounded GFCI, that he does this all the time, and that if I doubted him, to ask the city inspector.
He did not label the GFCI outlets as "no equipment ground", which also seems like a no-no.
Am I right that this is bad? Is it bad only in the case of a miswired circuit? I can find one or two web sites that say it is bad but "someone said so on a web page" does not make a persuasive argument, and if it is unsafe, I'd rather have it fixed than wait and raise it with the inspector. Can anyone point to an authoritative description of why this is bad? I can see it is a problem for a miswired circuit with hot and neutral swapped. Are there other scenarios where it is dangerous or might increase reliance on the GFCI tripping correctly?
Based on my limited understanding of GFCI operation, with the jumper, if an appliance case were to become energized, current would immediately flow through the ground terminal, through the jumper to the neutral return, bypassing the GFCI transformer and tripping the GFCI. Without the jumper, energizing the case wouldn't produce a current until (say) my body creates an alternate path to ground. The first scenario actually seems marginally better?
-- Dave
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It's improper to do, but the only ill affect I can see would be if any of the outlets "actually" became grounded.

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I'm not an expert on electrical wiring, but it seems to me that the dangerous part is having a gfci where there is no ground - you would assume it';s safer than it is. You wouldn't want an ungrounded outlet there, would you? - the gfci will work the same way, for all intents and purposes.
shelly
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

I believe code allows an ungrounded outlet to be replaced with a gfci. The last gfci I bought came with "no equipment ground" stickers. I assume these stickers are placed on an ungrounded gfci to alert the user that there is no ground.
Grounded or not, it seems a gfci will trip anytime there is an interruption to current flow.
-Felder
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It will still detect current going through your body to ground. With a ground wire the current _may_ go through the ground wire instead.

Correct
Also correct.

A GFCI will trip when the current in the hot and neutral are different by 5mA (0.005A). If the current is different it is going somewhere - possibly through your body to ground.
-- bud--
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It can only trip if its internal electronics is powered up. If you lose neutral when the power is off, the electronics will not be powered with the power comes back on. Then you could draw AMPS from the HOT wire to ground and the GFCI will not react.

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