Unfrozen Toilet tank bolts

Finally got the frozen nut off the bolt yesterday. Didn't have to use the hacksaw.
Apparently enough 0f the liquid wrench stuff had soaked in, and when I tried it Friday morning with the wrench / vise grips and screwdriver I was able to get the nut off and the tank dismounted.
Got the bowl out easily, and started pulling the old sheet vinyl and thats all coming along well.
Still thinking about the tank bolts though.
Nowadays, almost all toilet seat attachment hardware is the nylon bolt type.
Why not nylon bolts / nuts for the tank / bowl attachent?
When I was at Ace Thursday afternoon picking up a new wax ring for bowl re installation, I looked for nylon tank attachment hardware figuring that I'd have to replace the nut / bolt I thought I was going to have to saw through. No such animal. Only brass tank attachment stuff. I didn't think to ask the guy at Ace, who is usually pretty knowledgable. I picked up a set of brass hardware, which I will eventually have to return.
Anybody know why apparently no nylon tank bolt attachment hardware?
Second issue: I'm cleaning up the bolt threads in a wire wheel in the drill press. All nice and clean now. Really interesting aglommeration of green, blue, white and all shades in between of corrosion and crud now gone. It was concentrated where the nut was on the bolt, and below the nut.
Any thoughts on a lube or thread proctectant for the bolt threads before reassembling things so I don't run into this issue again?
(Yeah, I know, if its another 37 years on this specific toilet, it will be someone elses problem, not mine.)
But is there a reason not to use a simple lube like white lithium grease or even vaseline on the brass threads on the bolt and inside the nut?
Thanks.
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jJim McLaughlin wrote:

stretch and tanks would leak. In addition, nylon has a moisture problem where it will expand with time also causing leak. Frank
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I just checked my toilets. One is a Karet. It has plastic (nylon?) tank bolts.

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Whoops..tired fingers. It's the Karat (not Karet) toilet that has the plastic (nylon?) tank bolts.

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DerbyDad03 wrote:

plastic tank bolts were used. You can also engineer around plastic properties to make it work adequately.
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- Any thoughts on a lube or thread proctectant for the - bolt threads before reassembling things so I don't run into this issue - again?
Don't take the tank off next time and you won't run into the issue again.
Now, please don't think I'm just being a smart-a** here. I look at it this way:
If the tank and bowl can be moved and stored as a single unit, why add any risk of damage or leaks by separating them? Even if you're 100% sure (and who can be?) that nothing will happen during disassembly/ reassembly, why do the extra work?
In your original thread I said OK when you said "You do it your way, I'll do it mine" and I mean that. However, just like in the original thread, I'm asking *why*. I've explained why I do it my way, and I'm simply curious as to why you do it your way. Maybe I'll learn something, and isn't that why we hang out in this group - to give and get advice on home repair?
So, if you wouldn't mind, please share your reasons for taking the tank off. I promise not to argue or criticize. I'm simply curious.
Thanks!
wrote:

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for applications like this. But in the modern world, wouldn't a good grade of stainless steel be a better choice? That is what I use for wet-area work, if I think I will ever need to take it apart again. On boats, isn't stainless for fasteners pretty well universal these days? Piss and seawater are pretty close in salt and chemical content, after all. I'd happily pay an extra couple of bucks for a bolt kit I knew I wouldn't have to cut off five years later. (I HATE plastic toilet seat bolts- the damn things will NOT stay tight more than a couple of weeks.)
aem sends...
aem sends....
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Do you piss into and/or under the tank of your toilet? You do realize that this discussion is about the bolts that hold the tank onto the bowl. If you're pissing on those bolts, you need to learn how to aim better.
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(Snip)>> - Show quoted text -

Yes, I know it is the tank bolts. Yes, people do miss (in the dark) once in a while. Even if not direct hits, it is still a wet environment, from condensation in summer, if nothing else, and gets cleaned with pretty harsh stuff that throws off fumes that corrode metals, and leaks into the crack between stool and tank.
The tank bolts and the seat bolts are only inches apart, and someone else brought up plastic bolts.
aem sends...
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On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 16:08:54 -0700, jJim McLaughlin

My guess is that they snap or rip after a while.
If this happens with the toilet seat, just make sure you don't flush yourself down.

When doing repairs, I care about others almost as much as myself. I would say the reason not to worry is it's only once every 37 years. If you need to remove the toilet in 20 years, it won't be as hard as it was this time.
Reading other answers: I've only replaced one toilet. Another guy took it off in one piece and I put it back on in one piece. It wasn't hard. I think I only lifted it at one end, probably leaving the front edge on the floor.
(I also didn't replace the wax ring, because it disgusted me and I was doing her a favor. The house and toilet were almost new, less than a year. I saw her for another 6 months and it didn't give any problems in that time.

The bolts might come off when you don't want them too? Just a guess.

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wrote:

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Gary wrote:
MAJOR SNIPS

Its not the flange bolts we ar talking about. Its the tank bolts.
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wrote:

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wrote:

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