Underground phone line cut to house

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In article
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If I know there already exists one (or more) buried splices in a single run of buried drop, I usually have the line replaced. Given their assured, eventual failure, more than one or two buried splices further reduces the usable life of the line.

Graybar Electric comes to mind, but you didn't hear it from me.
--
:)
JR

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In article
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Unless the official locating marks (if called for) were "off" by more than 18-inches or the locator was a "no show", the digger pays.

Have you called them? If no, you should.

If a simple, permanent repair is done, it should be less than $200. Homeowner's insurance covers such things but I can't imagine anyone with a deductible less than $200.

That's OK and quite common. Just don't attempt a DIY "permanent" fix. It will fail and, in the frost belt, it always dies in January or February when the frost is 3-feet deep. In such a case, I just lay a temporary wire on top of the ground and the hapless homeowner gets to mow around it for x months until a new drop is placed or I come back, dig up the newly landscaped yard and do the repair at that later time.
Bite the bullet and have the telco fix it properly. It will last MUCH (years) longer and you will enjoy trouble-free service <gag, hack> for it.
Look at it this way: You'll probably never cut another buried line.
--
:)
JR

Climb poles and dig holes
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Jim Redelfs wrote:

Or he can just get cable modem service, go VOIP, port his current number and ditch the evil TELCO forever...
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wrote:

Heh! He wouldn't be the first - or last.
--
:)
JR

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My former neighbor, a farmer had a waterline leaking underground near his barn. He took a front end loader and started digging. Not only did he chop his own phone line to the house, but two other main lines that feed the whole area. About a dozen farms lost phone service. He chopped one of those lines in 3 or 4 different places, which made it look as if it was placed in the same trench as the water line. The phone company fixed it, then sent him a bill for close to $2000. He was pissed, but he had no choice because he should have had them mark the path (which is free).
On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 07:20:14 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

He got off cheap if it was a main cable, damaged in more than one place.
I worked yesterday (Sunday) and restored service to a rural residence (acreage) whose phone line was augered apart in four out of five holes mechanically dug for tree planting. They just drove in there (no locates) and started blowing holes in the ground. Look overhead: There's NO WIRES up there! Where are they? Also, just because there ARE wires in the air, it does NOT mean there aren't ALSO buried wires. Some utilities bury their lines, others hang 'em because it's cheaper.
1 cut = 2 splices 2 cuts = 4 splices 3 cuts = 6 splices etc.
After the first cut, I just abandon the wire and order a new one to replace the destroyed wire. Of course, to restore service to the affected customer, I laid a temporary wire across the expansive lawn of the neighbor that cut the wire.
Call before you dig, folks! You're already paying for the locating service as part of your utility bills.
Heck, there's anywhere from 240 to 8kVAC down there! Then there's gas, water and more.
--
:)
JR

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd put 20:1 odds against the phone company fixing the lines for free. Your viable options are to either repair the line properly yourself (since it's just your service), or have the phone company repair it for what I would expect to be a couple hundred dollars. Be glad you didn't hit a power line and electrocute yourself. The call before you dig numbers are easy, free and can save you a lot of headaches.
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That sounds about like what I was thinking. Even though I hadn't called to find out where the lines were first, it was clearly evident where the line was as I could see where it exited the house into the ground right at the foundation. I just hadn't expected the line to still be buried about 4-5" at about 5 feet from the foundation. I cannot recall if we placed the line at that shallow depth after a prior nearby dig-up of the water line, or if the line was always that depth.
Even if I HAD called before digging I probably would have dug in the same place, it was only about 5" down that I was digging, to put some landscaping border edging in. I'm surprised it hadn't ever been cut before.
To further complicate things, a friend of mine says he called his buddy at the telco (who has a position that deals with these things) and he says they wouldn't charge to fix it.
Call me paranoid, but that sounds too good to be true, especially when telco's are losing income as people drop their land lines completely....and me not having called first. So I'm not calling them until I can get some assurance that there will not be any charges.
In the meantime, I am looking around for the proper way to fix it, which at this point seems to be by the 'push button' type splicers you mentioned (which i used to get the line repaired, temporarily) or by some heat shrink butt splicers, covered by layers of shrink wrap and surrounded by the proper 'goo' before reburial.
Thanks for all the input
phil "
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On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 13:00:59 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The telco has special connectors that contain some goo, probably silicone. If the guy said he will do it for free, maybe he could just furnish the connectors to your friend. On the other hand, the cable may be too short to splice. Depends on the connectors and the way it was cut. You may have to replace the shortest part, which sounds like the piece going into the house. If you do have telco come, at least dig those few feet so they can get done fast. (dig carefully so you do not chop it more). Is this just a single residence? I'm curious why you have a 10 wire cable? My house just has a 2 wire. One phone line only.
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On Nov 19, 4:44�pm, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

geez i would do it a different way, run a entire new line, buried shallow to save digging work but run inside conduit, for future physical protection.
frankly i dont like spliced repairs and make do fixes..........
perhaps its just me,,,,,,,,,,,
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In article

Buried splices are like light bulbs and hard-disk drives: It's not IF - it's WHEN.
Left undisturbed, buried cable/drop will outlast the house. Put a "hole" in it and you can set your timer:
Even the best buried splice, done properly by a telco technician will eventually fail.
--
:)
JR

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Jim Redelfs wrote:

What causes a "proper" splice to fail. Not disagreeing, just curious.
--
bud--

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bud-- wrote:

Water ingress is normally the problem. "Proper" would, of course, prevent that in theory...getting a permanent watertight seal in field installation doesn't always happen.
--


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Water, and maybe soil that's heaving (shifting) due to freezing & thawing. Some wire is below the frost line, but maybe not where it enters the house.
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On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 15:25:07 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

All that said I would suggest he fix it the best he can and hopefully it will last until the scars of recent digging have cured. It it starts acting up after that, call the telco and say your phone is broke. They will test it and if they think the wire went bad they will just run a new one, never digging out his splice of shame.
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wrote:

I can't argue with that especially since the OP said the power utility had already cut the line elsewhere some time prior.
--
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JR

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Moisture eventually breeches even the best encapsulant as the encapsulant ages.
Frost heave exacerbates the process, flexing the splice over time. Moisture follows a little pinhole-size gap and infiltrates the splice. Eventually, the moisture compromises the plastic insulation and the copper conductors contact a ground source and each other. This is manifested by static, hum, buzz and is worse during a wet season.
In the repair world there is a commonly-used acronym: ETIR.
Every Time It Rains.
--
:)
JR

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On Nov 19, 4:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

The guy said the TELCO would do it for free, not the guy personally. Which would be great, if it was true. I'm just not really convinced its true and I don't want to tell them what address it is until I'm sure there won't be any cost to me. (for the reasons I mentioned above).
House built 1974. Underground black cable, goldish metallic shielding, ten strands of multi-cored wire inside, coated with a clearish gel- like substance. All original as far as I know. It is buried way back from the tel pole at the road, about 1 furlong (660 feet). The connections that restored the service were the solid blue and the blue/ white strands. I've left the rest unconnected for now, but protected from the elements.
phil
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On Nov 19, 6:27 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

thats ten strands of multi-COLORED wires, not multi-cored wires.
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If the problem is on THEIR side of the user friendly box, then it's THEIR problem. Just call and say the phone is not working, and it's dead at the test port also.
s

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