Type of fire extinguisher for home use?

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

Thanks for posting.
I've inspected thousands of extinguishers over years and years. They had vanilla cards; dates and initials were required for the inspection date. We followed the safety managers policy. Never once did we shake a unit. They were rotated as necessary.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That sounds like a very convincing argument for shaking the extinguisher as often as practical. That way, you won't have to worry about those pesky, troublesome lumps ever forming.

The extinguishers we are discussing here are HOME extinguishers, not commercial extinguishers. They are not serviced either properly or improperly. They get replaced when the cheap little gauge is no longer pointing to the green wedge.

In a matter of seconds I can find tens of thousands of website pages that recommend that dry chemical extinguishers should be turned upside down and shaken MONTHLY. These sites include many government agencies, large non-profit organizations with an interest in safety, fire prevention departments of cities large and small, and commercial websites.
Try a google search for yourself. Here's one that gets well 16000 hits using the serach terms fire extinguisher" "maintenance" "shake"
<http://www.google.com/search?q=%22fire+extinguisher%22+%22maintenance%22+%22shake%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like to turn the dry chem types upside down, and shake the heck out of them to keep the powder loose. Makes me look like a nut, I'm sure.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Take a peek at your fire extinguisher. Aim at the base of the fire; using sweeping motions.
That was the was I was trained in office safety classes.
The other was to use the correct type for the fire - ya don't put liquid type on and electrical fire....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree.

I hope your brother misunderstood the safety expert. It has been my experience that the discharge RATE or "strength" is about the same for the smaller units as it is for the larger ones.

Get the larger one. In fact, based on FIRST HAND experience, I highly recommend that you get as large an extinguisher (ABC-type) as you can. The larger models are of a higher quality, too.
The little ones are just that: Little. They are too little to be effective on all but the smallest fire. You would be surprised to learn how quickly they empty.
In the case of my aforementioned first hand experience, a "little" fire extinguisher made a very nice, small "hole" in the fire. This conflagration required the fire department but convinced me of the LACK of effectiveness of the small extinguisher. They have their place (RV, boat, kitchen wall, etc) but, if you are purchasing your first extinguisher, you should get a large one and keep it in a central part of the home, near an exit.
Good luck. I hope you never HAVE to use it.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Daniel Prince wrote:

Don't start a fire and save a lot of trouble.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.