Type of fire extinguisher for home use?

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I have read or seen on TV that one should use fire extinguishers that have a hose attached to the outlet because they are easier to aim. My brother said that a safety expert at his workplace says that one should not use a fire extinguisher larger than a 1A 10BC for home use because larger ones would blow the fire (or burning grease) around.
The only fire extinguishers that have hoses seem to be 3A 40BC or larger. Which type should we get? Thank you in advance for all replies. -- Whenever I hear or think of the song "Great green gobs of greasy grimey gopher guts" I imagine my cat saying; "That sounds REALLY, REALLY good. I'll have some of that!"
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On Tue, 01 Apr 2008 06:16:03 -0700, Daniel Prince

I think your brother's "expert" needs some training in how to properly use a fire extiguisher. Those small extinguishers may be enough to help you get out of a burning building if you are lucky. Usually, the little extinguishers run out of juice before you might prefer. I would go for the largest capacity you can easily handle. You could also opt for a large one and a small one mounted side by side.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

extinguishers doesn't do the trick, it seems, then I best get out and wait for the FD.
One of the small ones did the trick when a small child found a lighter, lit a piece of paper, and dropped it.......the burning paper caught the drape on fire, and that is when adult discovered it. A few seconds later and it would have been a situation of "get out now".
Throughout school and employment, I've attended safety sessions which have included how to use an extinguisher. Awfully valuable info, IMO. You don't aim INTO burning liquid because you want to avoid splashing it. You aim across the top so's to kill the O2 supply at the surface.
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wrote:

Just hope that you aren't in a situation where that little bitty 1A10BC fire extinguisher isn't up to the job of getting you out of there and saving your life. I'm only required to have 2 small fire extinguishers on my sailboat. I have 3 bigger ones. One at each end of the boat and one near the center, 4A60BC.

It was already time to "get out now". Everyone should have gotten out FIRST before making any judgement about whether to fight it yourself. You are correct that it is often a matter of seconds between oops, and death.

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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

unpleasant.
the rest of the family". This was a four year-old who had wakened to get a snack. He tried to put out the paper, but got scared and crawled in bed with mom and dad.
Fire department followed up and gave him some more instruction.

on it if possible. It would be shooting gobs of smoke and grease into the air, which can flash over.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Which brings up a point that has been missed so far. If you are going to fight a fire with an extinguisher, do it with your back to the door and monitor your escape route. Things can go sour in seconds.
Keep your fire extinguishers near an exit, so you won't have to go deeper into the building to get one. You might also keep some sticks and a bag of marshmallows there, so you'll have something to do while waiting for the fire department.
-- Doug
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You can always throw empty fire extinguishers in....
Yer right, about watch your exit, and be ready to bail out. With dignity.
--
Christopher A. Young
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This might be the most important post of all!
Obvious, yes, but when the thought finally comes to you, IT'S TOO LATE :-(
Thank you!
David
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I have several small ABC Kiddie fire extinguishers. Most are mounted near an exterior door. I have one in the kitchen, basement shop, garage, and truck. The pressure dial shows the extinguisher has pressure and should be periodically inspected. An open box of baking soda near the stove is very effective for grease fires. The thing to keep in mind is to have the extinguishers ready and easily accessible. Hopefully, you won't ever have to use one.
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Here's another good tip: Every month or so, take each extinguisher off its bracket and shake it vigorously until you can hear the powder moving inside. If they hand for long periods, the gauge will still say they are good, but the powder will haved settled itself into a solid lump and the extinguisher will not work.
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On Tue, 01 Apr 2008 23:32:25 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Do you have a link? One that suggest; this, shaking vigorously?!
TRUMP Tower in Las Vegas opened Monday. Can you imagine the money to be made shaking fire extinguishers monthly...!
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Trump Tower is stocked with dry powder extinguishers?
I don't have a link. This is something that I've known for many years, and I've heard repeated many times. Maybe the website for Kidde or some other major manufacturer mentions it.
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On Wed, 02 Apr 2008 01:24:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Not stocked full, but they must have some. Why pull a hose pipe fire hose for a trash can fire :-)) I suppose a roaring trash can fire will set the sprinkler off.

first I read about it, except your mention of it.
This shaking, as part of the maintenance is not mentioned on my units. It gives other things to check for, but not mention of shaking the fire extinguisher. They ought to fix that!
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The old soda acids, you had to turn em upside down to operate. Some folks don't know the new way. Turn upside down, and the dip tube (now at the top) draws off the pressure.
Now days, extinguishers are used with handles and nozzles at the top.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Just for yuks, I just googled:
"shake" "extinguisher"
See what you think!
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http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=dry+chem+extinguisher+caking+shake+&btnG=Google+Search
http://boating.ncf.ca/fire.html http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-7351759.html http://books.google.com/books?id=gOLEhDB0vzgC&pg=PA98&lpg=PA98&dq=dry+chem+extinguisher+caking+shake+&source=web&ots=UooQClac7M&sig IibcCI5tuedF3CMYCavlwwHGk&hl=en
--
Christopher A. Young
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

It takes a lot longer then a month for the chemical to compact to a non flowing state. Follow the instructions on the label that contains the listing mark. You only need to take it off of the hook once every six months. You then simply invert it and wait for the powder to fall loosely to the top of the cylinder. You can feel the powder drop. Do not pound or shake! If the powder doesn't fall loose on it's own the extinguisher should be serviced or replaced. Turn the extinguisher right side up and put it back on the bracket.
--
Tom Horne, Firefighter

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes but we aren\'t no blackguards to.
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The old guy who did my dry chem, tips em upside down and beats on them with a rubber mallet. He's a character.
--
Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

So, you are claiming that stirring up the powder more frequently to PREVENT it from caking is not as good as waiting to do it until after it already starts to settle and cake? Okay!
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I'm saying that the powder will not cake in that short a time unless there is something wrong with it. Some examples of the something wrong are moisture in the cylinder, mixing of incompatible powders, or over charging of the unit with too much chemical.
Shaking the extinguisher seems to make sense at the intuitive level but it is not, in fact, best practice. By shaking the extinguisher you may break up the caking into lumps that will plug the nozzle orifice during use preventing the extinguisher from discharging at the point when you need it most.
By doing as I've described you have an opportunity to detect a problem with the extinguisher prior to a need arising. If you shake or bang the extinguisher around you are more likely to conceal a defect then you are to clear one.
I base this on three years of work as a fire extinguisher technician in California were the fire code requires that all extinguishers be torn down annually instead of at the National Fire Protection Association recommended interval of six years. During that time I found many extinguishers that had been rendered inoperative by an incompetent service technician's work the previous year but I never found one inoperative due to chemical caking except were the extinguisher had been improperly charged with damp air rather then dry nitrogen and when incompatible chemicals had been mixed. I serviced literally several thousand extinguishers during that period. I have been involved in the fire and rescue service in many capacities since that time. I've personally inspected hundreds of fire extinguishers using the method I've suggested. I've found two, that I can recall, were the powder would not fall of it's own weight and both were in need of servicing. I only did the follow up work on one of them and found that the extinguisher had been improperly charged with incompatible chemicals. On the other one the follow up was done by the Fire Marshall's office because it involved a day care center. I never heard what the cause of that one needing service was. I do know that during subsequent company in service inspections of that premise that extinguisher behaved as it should have with the powder falling loose of it's own weight.
It's just a suggestion sir. Do it however you like but you won't find one manufacturers recommendation or one set of "labeled" maintenance instructions that directs the shaking or striking of the extinguisher.
--
Tom Horne

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes but we aren\'t no blackguards to.
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