Type A transmission fluid

Found almost nothing about Type A transmission fluid on the net, except that it was used in the 40's and 50's, and yet I thought I bought or used some decades later than that.
Does every xmission fluid meet Type A standards now? I have to refill and replace my '95 LeBaron conervertible power top motor/pump and I guess I know anything will work fine, but the just about identical '88 motor I'm replacing it with says to use Type A.
Did Dexron Mercon used to be labeled type A also?
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Dexron
DEXRON-III MERCON provides superior wear protection for all passenger cars and light trucks requiring the use of a Type A or Type A Suffix A, DEXRON, DEXRON-II, DEXRON-IIE, DEXRON-III or MERCONAutomatic Transmission Fluid --

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Except for those that don't... :) It's been so long since I had anything except GM I really am not sure, but I believe there's still a difference between the old Type F and equivalents...

Again, don't think it was ever labeled as Type A (because while it met/ exceded those standards, that wasn't the standard it was labeled against) but was an acceptable substitute.
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It turns out that Type F was also an outgrowth of Type A, so maybe F meets A standards as well.

OK, I probably read what you said somewhere, or maybe what User posted, but I didn't find it today when I looked.
At any rate, it turns out I didn't need any more fluid anyhow. If interested in a story, see A Story, not a Question, which is about 3 to 5 threads down from this one.
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No, I'm sure there were differences there -- not so much in lubricity but in viscosity and other more esoteric properties. You definitely did not want to either mix them nor use the one where the other was called for.
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OK, the nostalgia bug hit so I did a little looking... :)
Couple of comments on your questions in addition to before -- Dexron and Mercon are different. Mercon was the Ford follow-on to Type F. What the looking reminded me of was what the "F" was was a "high friction" type for the Ford transmissions of the day. Those transmissions were designed significantly different than the GM and required more friction-transmission properties (and consequently had to withstand higher temperatures). A Type A in a Ford transmission would break down early and not provide good performance at all whereas the frictional properties of the Type F in a GM tranny sorta' "gummed it up" as a catchall description. Definitely was a bad deal to use the wrong one for any length of time.
But, for your case, despite your later note you don't need additional fluid, I'll note I'd go w/ the recommendation for the pump, I'd go w/ the pump recommendation rather than the motor if you're switching and they're significantly different. For that purpose, however, I agree most any will work fine, but I would try to avoid mixing types.
As a finale, here's a brief description of the current class of most popular ATFs -- note that those that need Type F still are not compatible w/ Mercon/Dexron(s)...
DEXRON(r) -III This is a specification for General Motors vehicles, but many foreign manufactures specify a DEXRON approved ATF as well. DEXRON-III can be used in transmissions that call for DEXRON-IIE or DEXRON-II.
MERCON(r)
Most Ford vehicles manufactured between 1980 and 1999 specify a MERCON ATF. ATFs that meet DEXRON-III requirements usually meet the MERCON requirements as well.
MERCON(r) V
Beginning with the 1997 model year, Ford introduced a higher performance level ATF with the MERCON V specification. Many Ford automatic transmissions from 1999 on will require a MERCON V fluid. The most notable exceptions are the E40D, 4R100, and CD4E transmissions, which still specify regular MERCON ATF.
Type F
Type F is specifically designed for all pre-1977 Ford vehicles and some makes between 1977 and 1981. Effective March 1997, Ford discontinued administration of approvals for Type F fluids. However, there are still many vehicles on the road that use Type F. Type F and MERCON fluids are not interchangeable.
ATF+3(r) /ATF+4(r)
DaimlerChrysler has had their own ATF specifications for many years, but as of 1997, Chrysler owners' manuals no longer list DEXRON as an acceptable replacement. ATF+3 is a readily available mineral oil-based ATF that is suitable in any application calling for ATF PLUS(r) , ATF +2(r) , or a Type 7176(r) fluid. Vehicles manufactured after 1999 require ATF+4(r), a synthetic-based ATF only available through DaimlerChrysler.

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OK, I had found a couple of other things that I meant to add (and I promise this is the last :) )...I looked at the SAE site on standards for ATF and found two abstracts that had some interesting info..
First is abstract from a technical paper "History of Automotive Lubrication" -- Today's lubricant quality is defined by classifications, or specifications, that are established by taking into account metallurgy, equipment design, and/or operating conditions. For engine oils, the American Petroleum Institute (API), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) are the key bodies that define industry needs, establish classifications, and develop test methods to assure that lubricants meet the required performance. For gear oils, API and the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) play a similar role. The U.S. Military and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have their own performance requirements that are usually over and above those of the API/SAE/ASTM and API/CRC. The performance requirements of automatic transmission fluids (ATFs) are established by OEMs, such as General Motors Corporation (GM) and the Ford Motor Company. ...
The second was a paper written by GM engineers for some conference in 1968 which was for the dual purpose of getting the info out and promoting the (then new) product --
Title: Dexron Automatic Transmission Fluids Are Higher Quality Than Formerly Used Type A Fluids
Author(s): Robert L. Anderson - General Motors Res. Labs. Norman A. Hunstad - General Motors Res. Labs.
Abstract: The minimum quality of Dexron automatic transmission fluids is higher than that of the formerly used Type A fluids. They will provide improved transmission operation, both initially and for extended periods of service.
These fluids were developed principally to achieve longer shift-time retention and clutch plate durability. Advances were also made in respect to low-temperature fluidity, antifoam quality, fluid-seal compatibility, oxidation resistance, and fluid-nylon compatibility. This paper reviews the development of these fluids, and outlines the recently established specification requirements and qualification procedures which are used to define this higher quality level for fluids supplied to the service fluid market.
I'm sure a search for Ford and Chrysler would produce similar reports...
So, overall, it is a case of the manufacturers developed products specifically designed for their own needs.
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