Tying into the seage drain


Hi,
I have recently posted a question about tapping into this drain:
http://freeboundaries.com/drain.jpg
and I received good advice to actually tie into one of the smaller pipes that go into it. Well it turns out that that location is too high and would allow the space for a long-enough standpipe for my washer.
So I have to tie into that drain somewhere lower. The drain that you see in the picture is actually 4 feet off the floor but it takes a 90 degree turn downwards and it's into this vertical part of the drain that I would need to tie in. So my question again is: what's involved? I assume it's cast iron so I would somehow have to drill a hole in the cast iron and attach a 2" pipe. What do I need and where do I start?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
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No, you don't drill a hole in it. You cut out a section of it and tie in a PVC (or ABS in Canada and some western states) 4" x 2" WYE (or sanitary Tee) with a couple short pcs of 4" PVC above and below, and use Clamp-Alls to tie to the cast iron. A "snap cutter" makes short work of cutting the stack, but I have good success with a 4" grinder and a cheapie diamond blade.
Feel free to email me off list for more details if you need them.
JK
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Big_Jake wrote:

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Thanks for the advice!
Just so that I visualize it correctly, does the PVC pipe go on the inside for the stack, the outside, or just about flush?
Also, I own a grinder, buy I am wondering if it would still work if my stack is only a couple of inches away from the wall.
Thanks again,
Aaron
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It has to go flush so the rubber coupling will slide over and seal against both pipes where they meet.
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On Sep 21, 7:11am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yep. Cutting the pipe close to the wall will be tough with the grinder. The least difficult way to finish off the cut will be a recip saw with a grit blade, but that is still tough. You might want to rent a snap cutter instead.
JK
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Is this the kind of tool we are talking about?
Thanks!
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Forgot the link:
http://www.drillspot.com/products/69095/Grip_ON_GR186-12_Chain_Pipe_Cutter
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Yes.
See if a local tool rental place has one, rather than owning it.
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Jim always beats me to the punch! :-)
My local Home Depot rents them, but the one in your link is pretty wimpy, and completely maxes out on a 4" stack. Rent a Ridgid.
JK
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