Tying in baseboard and sanitary casing


Hi,
All the doors in my house are dressed the same: 3/4 sanitary casing with cabinet head. I also have 3/4 baseboard.
I'm replacing the casing on a couple of doors. The problem is that sanitary casing that's available today in 9/16" but the baseboard is still 3/4". So it doesn't work where they meet.
What's the best way to tie them together? Easing the baseboard from 3/4 -> 9/16? Or somehow working the baseboard over the casing? I'm not sure I'm explaining myself well but it's the best I can do. :)
Thanks,
Aaron
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Sam Takoy wrote:

Go to a real lumber yard with a scrap of what you have now and have them mill what you need. I have done that numerous times to match something existing and it gives an excellent result and isn't expensive.
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The other alternative is to put a square/rectangular block of wood where they meet so each piece of trim butts up against the block. The block can be deeper/thicker than either piece of trim so that the differences are less noticeable. I have that treatment in several places in my 50 year-old/ house, they were part of the original design.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

If I decided to mill my own sanitary casing, what's the radius on that quarter round?
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Sam Takoy wrote:

old-style yard that has some old stock, you could lay some flat stock behind the casing make it the right thickness. No, the contour won't be perfect, but unless there is another door with the old casing a foot away, nobody will ever notice. Also check habitat restore or similar place for ripout material, if the new installation will be painted. If the guy tearing out the old stuff was careful, it may be clean enough to reuse.
-- aem sends...
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What is sanitary casing?
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Google sez it is what most of us call ranch casing, or similar. Presumably because it has no grooves and is easier to keep clean, or at least provides a more sanitary and less fussy look. IOW, somewhere between square stock and the fancy stuff, often tapered with a relief groove on the back, to make it easier to fine-tune reality and get an acceptable result if things aren't quite square and flat.
-- aem sends...
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Choices: *See if you can find some old stock for the door casing. *Use plinths at the bottom of the door casing to allow base and case to die against. *Replace the base back to some point that does away with the problem *Cut a 45 degree face bevel on the thicker stock. Sorry, I can't find a picture, it is NOT a full bevel, just a slight bevel on the front face - a bit like running a round over bit on the end of a rectangular piece.
--
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