Two, yes two thermostats.

Saw a question from last year about using two thermostats and the person was told to do ten different things other than what she wanted. I NEED to use 2, and here is why. I have a recording studio where the therm controls were mounted inside the room with the recording equiptment. In the summer the therm turns on the air to cool this room down because it can get over 85 pretty quick. The room with musicians stays cool all the time. Now, in the winter, we have to move the therm to the musicians room or the heat never goes on and it gets cold. After a couple of years of moving this unit I decided to buy another thermostat (I already ran two sets of wires to the heater) These rooms are sealed off from one another with doubled drywall, staggered studs, seperate entrys and sand between their isolated frames. so blocking vents and all that stuff is not going to work. Was considering a 4pdt switch to go from one to the other, but maybe there is another way? Right now I just switch the wires inside the heater, but They will wear out if I keep doing that. Thanks
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Not sure if I understand. You have one heating/cooling source that you want to control from two locations. One in the summer the other in the winter. If you buy a two thermostats that have a on/off switch and heat/cool switch (most programable thermostates have these) you can turn off the thermostat when necessary while leaving the other on. You don't mention the type of heat. This might not work for electric heat baseboard heat but should work for heat suppy by a furnance.
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"ten different things"? What's that got to do with anything here?
What is "the room with musicians"? Some sort of bullpen?
You need a switch to duplicate what you're doing manually. Could even use a relay. Just label settings winter/summer, and leave notes about what you did for future residents.
J
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one of these?? http://www.smarthome.com/30401.HTML

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wrote:

Why not use a wireless thermostat? then wherever you have the remote it senses the temp in that room. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ spam protection measure, Please remove the 33 to send e-mail
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kibbleman wrote:

What you need is a professional HVAC tech to take a look at the system you have and determine if there is anyway to get it to function the way you want. You may need a second system, or at least as second AC unit.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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wrote:

I"m not sure why you seem to thing a 4pdt is not good enough. But.... :) If you run twice as many wires (maybe just 2 or 3 more?) to one of your two thermostat locations, you can put the 4pdt there, instead of by the furnace.
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kibbleman wrote:

You can wire them both in simultaneously, use a three way switch near the unit to swap from one red to the other. The other wires don't need to be switched.
oR1--to t-stat1 R from unit to 3-way Common-->o---- oR2--to t-stat2
Ideally you should zone the system. As an add-on option, You can install thermostatically controlled dampers in the duct system. The dampers are controlled by a separate stat(s). Typically, with two zones, you'll want the system stat in the zone with the least airflow (warmest in summer and coldest in winter), with the damper's stat and damper controlling airflow into the higher capacity zone.
An improvement over this is to get the ducts balanced. In some situations this is impossible due to greatly varying load in specific zones. This is common in many buildings, and the tenants often have the same complaint. The add-on dampers work sufficiently well, and are typically much less expensive than the other acceptable alternatives. HTH.
hvacrmedic
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I think a lot of people with 1 zone systems that cannot be easily balanced would benefit from a simple solution.
Two thermostats - No - really two temp sensors and one set the temp thingy. For cooling, set the max temp, one room will obviously be cooler. For heating, set the min temp, one room will be warmer.
Many houses 'round here are configured with only one zone. Mine is a 2900 sq ft 2 story house. I have bedroom set up as a home office/classroom with 3 PCs in it and another basement home office room with 2 PCs in it. Ideally temp sensors would be placed in the problem rooms as well as one in a general central location. Set the temp and the system will operate as described above. No switches, not gadgetry, no x-10, no wireless remotes. KISS principle should apply for operation.

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You can put 2 T-stats in parallel. But what will happen is when the heat kicks on in the musicians area, the control room ( with all the recording equipment) will also get heat, assuming this is a one zone system. And the heat will not kick off until the musicians room temperature is satisfied. Example: if you set the musicians room at 70 degrees, the control room might get as high as 75-80 degrees. If this does not pose a problem, then it can be done, otherwise you need a seperate zone for each area.
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