Two stroke motor without ENGINE OIL???

Page 1 of 3  
I recently bought a Echo PB-755 Backpack Blower to blow leaves in my yard.
I am very puzzled by it. It is a 2 stroke engine. Takes 50:1 oil.
There is no separate tank/port/opening for engine oil.
The manual has not a single word mention of engine oil (like 10w30 or whatever).
So, all indications are that this engine needs no oil.
I can hardly believe this as all gas engines I have seen so far needed engine oil.
Is my conclusion that the engine needs no oil, correct?
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

RTFM. Yes, it needs oil. The oil is added to the gas.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I actually did say that oil is added to gas. I did not miss it. I am surprised that there is no separate oil system, to oil all the moving parts. How are they lubricated?
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
you're kidding right? Are you thirteen? Have you never owned a 2 stroke engine before? The oil in the gas passes through the crankcase and does the lubricating before it goes into the combustion chamber.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ignoramus1841 wrote:

Hi, Leanr how 2 stroke motors work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Oct 2007 09:44:15 -0500, Ignoramus1841 wrote:

The fue/air mixture is ported so it contacts moving parts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I see that you have the explanation how they work. I apologize for the 'rtfm' comment. Thinking back I was in the same position when someone told me that diesel engines don't have spark plugs...well, not after they are running at least.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They don't have spark plugs before they are running either.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker LT wrote:
...[top posting repaired]...

> They don't have spark plugs before they are running either.
He's referring to glow plugs for starting, obviously...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
{bottom posting repaired by deleting}
REAL diesel engines have no glow plugs. Those are on the toy engines.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker LT wrote: ...

Not necessarily...depending on age and design there are a lot of very large diesel engines still out there w/ glow plugs.
What's your definition of "real" vs "toy"?
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
link me to any reference to a large diesel engine with glow plugs.
as for the toys:
5.7 Olds conversion 6.2 chevy truck monstrosity 7.3 navistar 6.0 navistar duramax diesel chevy uses. (not sure of the size) And any other diesel engine you can come up with that has glow plugs.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker LT wrote: ...

...
Well, guess that's one definition. Not a very useful, one, but one nonetheless...
Of current production, don't know directly other than the JD 5-cylinder used in their utility tractors (up to roughly 50 hp I'm guessing, maybe?) That they have been replaced w/ direct start w/ usually ether injection combined w/ block heaters for cold weather doesn't mean they weren't a significant alternative until fairly recently (10-15 years or so)...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's a fairly useful definition. Real diesels don't have precombustion chambers and therefore don't NEED any glow plugs. The precombustion chamber makes for a quieter engine. And Gawd knows we wouldn't want to hear the engine running nowadays.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker LT wrote:

...
I don't know what it's of use for is the deal. Torque, hp, fuel consumption, etc., are useful categorizations but I don't see the deal on some artificial "real" vis a vis "not real".
And, certainly, after 12-14 hour days on tractor or combine in the field, any more diesel noise than mandatory is certainly not anything I count as a blessing...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 10/17/2007 11:31 AM Steve Barker LT said the following:

They are on many of the big engines too, especially the big rigs. They are used in cold weather to preheat the cylinders (not to provide an ignition source).

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry, "big rig engines" (as you call them) don't have cylinder heaters, glow plugs, or any thing like that. What they do use on occasion is either assist on the intake.
Direct injection diesels don't as a rule have a problem starting cold.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 18:12:28 -0500, Steve Barker LT wrote:

High compression diesels (19:1>) don't need help from glow plugs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

True, technology tends to advance.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope. The old ones (TD6 and a T20 McCormic Deering in my case) started on gas (in the same cylinders).
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.